120 Views
Posted 11/08/17
One mic, one guitar, one engineer: Join Sonic Scoop’s Justin Colletti as he talks to Braund Studios to show you how to mic an acoustic guitar with a single microphone. In this video, you’ll get to hear the results of the most popular mic positions for acoustic guitar in action, as well as an overview of what a microphone sounds like pointed at different parts of the guitar’s body and neck.
228 Views
Posted 10/18/17
In the final part of this three-part series, Justin Colletti, of Sonic Scoop, and producer Bob Mallory, discuss how to handle the daunting task of choosing microphones, covering several examples from a single inexpensive dynamic to multiple pairs of condensers. Listen to A/B comparisons of spoken word and acoustic guitar sources recorded with different microphones, in the same acoustically treated room discussed in the first video of this series. They also give us some real-world suggestions on how to most effectively use your acoustic space to get higher-quality recordings, and go over a handful of often-overlooked factors that are crucial when recording vocals. Click on the links for Part 1 and Part 2 of this informative series.
926 Views
Posted 10/17/17
In Part 1 of this three-part series, Justin Colletti, of Sonic Scoop, and Bob Mallory (producer and engineer for Avatar Studios and Paste magazine), introduce you to the materials and construction methods needed to make your own acoustic panels for a home studio. From framing to covering, they discuss the ins and outs of assembling the panels, and the common problems that can be addressed by using them. Listen to A/B comparisons of acoustic guitar and voice-over in the original untreated room, versus the room with the home-built acoustic panels. Later in the video, recordings of full-range pink noise are played through studio monitors in the untreated room, and then in the acoustically treated space. A real-time analyzer is shown for visual comparison of the different resulting frequency responses. Tune in to Parts 2 and 3 to explore monitoring, speakers, headphones, mic techniques, mic lockers, and more.
58 Views
Posted 10/10/17
In Part 2 of this three-part series, Justin Colletti, of Sonic Scoop, and Bob Mallory (producer and engineer at Avatar Studios and Paste magazine), discuss home-studio monitoring with multiple sets of speakers, headphones, and interface setups. Learn about recommended monitoring gear that can be acquired on a modest budget, as well as the pros and cons of different types of headphones for tracking and mixing. They also dig into monitor controllers, and how to determine the right gear for your needs. Check out Part 3 for tips on microphone technique and mic lockers.
1583 Views
Posted 11/08/16
Join Sonic Scoop’s Justin Colletti as he tests out some tube condenser microphones that won’t break the bank.
819 Views
Posted 11/06/16
Hear the difference as Sonic Scoop’s Justin Colletti takes to Braund studios to contrast and compare many different microphones. The common through-line? All these mics are modelled on one of two classic capsules: The Neumann U47 and the AKG C 12.
3 Views
Posted 09/15/16
Time is of the essence in part 3 of this series—time-based effects, that is! Watch as Sonic Scoop’s Justin Colletti manipulates reverb and delay on a vocal track to craft a sense of ambiance.
484 Views
Posted 09/13/16
Sit down with Sonic Scoop’s Justin Colletti for this extended look at how to shape a vocal with EQ, dynamics manipulation, and automation.
333 Views
Posted 09/12/16
In this conversation between Grammy-Award winning producer/engineer John Congleton and Sonic Scoop’s Justin Colletti, Congleton talks about gear—specifically not letting it get in your way, utilizing non-fussy classics like SM7s, putting up as few microphones as possible on the drum set, figuring out the right pedal-chain for electric guitars, preserving dynamic control, and doing whatever you can to make the mix sound good.
448 Views
Posted 09/11/16
In this video, Sonic Scoop’s Justin Colletti gives you several tips for greatly improving vocals in a mix, including how to use commercial references to gauge how loud to make a vocal track, when to use automation, what kinds of time-based effects.
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