The a7S III Compared

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Long awaited is one of the best descriptors for the just-announced Sony a7S III. I've been waiting. You've been waiting. We've all been waiting. In the years since its predecessor was released, we've seen an unprecedented number of new video-capable cameras from every major camera manufacturer. That means there are a lot of very competitive options in the mirrorless and DSLR world when it comes to high-end video. We are going to take a closer look at some of these and how they compare to the new a7S III.

Sony Alpha a7S III Mirrorless Digital Camera

Setting the parameters for this test, we need to point out a lot is based purely on written specs. If you saw our Canon R5 Comparison, you might be familiar with this already. It's still early days for a few of these cameras, and with limited time and experience it's extremely difficult to put a definitive answer to the question of "Which camera is better?" Keep in mind this guide is meant to be helpful in pointing out where cameras differ and in what situations one option might excel over the other. Camera decisions tend to be very personal decisions as well. Just because one camera "wins," that doesn't mean it's going to be the best camera for you.

The Comparisons:
Panasonic S1H
Canon EOS R5
Sony a7 III
Sony a7S II
Sony a7R IV
FUJIFILM X-T4
Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 6K
Sony FX9

a7S III versus Panasonic S1H

The most direct competition in the video-oriented mirrorless space is the Panasonic S1H. They are priced similarly, use full-frame sensors, have many advanced features, and are going to be battling for top video in a compact system. Just to get it out front, both are great picks, they are just different.

a7S III versus Panasonic S1H

a7S III

Feature

Panasonic S1H

12MP BSI Full-Frame CMOS

Sensor

24MP Full-Frame CMOS

Sony E

Lens Mount

Leica L

4K up to 120p

Video Resolution

6K up to 24p

4K up to 60p

10-bit 4:2:2

Color Depth

10-bit 4:2:2

4K (16-bit) up to 60p via HDMI

Raw Video

5.9K (12-bit) up to 30p via HDMI

ISO 80-102400

(Extended: ISO 40-409600)

Sensitivity

ISO 100-51200

(Extended: ISO 50-204800)

5-Axis In-Body (5.5 Stops)

Stabilization

5-Axis In-Body (6 Stops)

None

Recording Limits

None

S-Log2, S-Log3, HLG

Other Video Features

V-Log, HLG

Dual Native ISO

Timecode Input

On-Sensor Phase-Detect

(92% coverage, 759 points)

Autofocus

Contrast-Detect (225 areas)

9.44m-dot OLED EVF

Viewfinder

5.76m-dot OLED EVF

3.0" Articulating Touchscreen

Screen

3.2" 2.33m-dot Articulating Touchscreen

2 x CFexpress Type A/SD

Media

2 x SD (UHS-II)

  • Sensor choice is the huge difference here. The a7S III opts for a lower resolution, but more sensitive 12MP backilluminated CMOS and the S1H uses a more conventional 24MP sensor that opens the door for greater than 4K video recording.
  • For 4K imaging resolutions, the a7S III hits 4K at up to 120p while the S1H only hits 4K up to 60p.
  • Panasonic has multiple greater than 4K options with the S1H able to record fullframe 6K up to 24p.
  • Both cameras can record 10bit 4:2:2 internally and externally.
  • For raw, both output over HDMI, though Sony has a better 16bit raw and Panasonic has higher resolutions available.
  • Sony's 759point phase-detect AF system is way faster and more responsive than the S1H's contrast system.
  • The Panasonic S1H's image stabilization system rates a half stop better.
  • Both cameras have their respective log formats and HLG HDR for maximum dynamic range.
  • The S1H is Netflix certified and has pro features like Dual Native ISO and support for timecode.
  • The a7S III is the king of low light with sensitivities up to ISO 409600.

Final Thoughts: Call me biased for Sony if you want, but I think a strong emphasis on improving 4K quality (plus 120p) is a bigger selling point than the greater than 4K resolutions the S1H offers. With solid autofocus, amazing dynamic range of 15+ stops, faster 4K frame rates, and a more fleshed-out lens ecosystem, the a7S III is a more complete package. Perhaps if you were working on a Netflix show with some Varicam systems and V-Log, then the S1H is objectively better. However, I suspect most average shooters will be using the a7S III as a main camera for web and don't need all the extra "pro" features of the S1H.

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a7S III versus Canon EOS R5

Both being very new cameras, the a7S III and Canon EOS R5 are certainly going to get a lot of scrutiny. To be honest, if you need a good all-around camera, one that addresses photography, too, you are going to want the a7R IV or Canon R5 instead of the a7S III. The a7S III is designed around video specs. But, the R5 does have some solid video chops, so we are going to compare them here.

a7S III versus Canon EOS R5

a7S III

Feature

EOS R5

12MP BSI Full-Frame CMOS

Sensor

45MP Full-Frame CMOS

Sony E

Lens Mount

Canon RF

4K up to 120p

Video Resolution

8K up to 30p

4K up to 120p

10-bit 4:2:2

Color Depth

10-bit 4:2:2

4K (16-bit) up to 60p via HDMI

Raw Video

Internal DCI 8K raw (12-bit)

ISO 80-102400

(Extended: ISO 40-409600)

Sensitivity

ISO 100-51200

(Extended: ISO 50-102400)

5-Axis In-Body (5.5 Stops)

Stabilization

5-Axis In-Body (8 Stops)

None

Recording Limits

8K: 20 minutes

4K60: 25 minutes

All: 30 minutes

S-Log2, S-Log3, HLG

Other Video Features

Canon Log, PQ-HDR

On-Sensor Phase-Detect

(92% coverage, 759 points)

Autofocus

Dual Pixel CMOS AF II

(100% coverage, 1,053 points)

9.44m-dot OLED EVF

Viewfinder

5.76m-dot OLED EVF

3.0" Articulating Touchscreen

Screen

3.2" 2.1m-dot Articulating Touchscreen

2 x CFexpress Type A/SD

Media

1 x CFexpress Type B

1 x SD (UHS-II)

  • Vastly different sensor resolutions: the a7S III has a lowres 12MP sensor, while the R5 has a 45MP sensor.
  • The a7S III is superior in low light, with extended sensitivities up to ISO 409600.
  • For stills, the R5's greater resolution is more useful.
  • The R5's image stabilization system rates higher at 8 stops.
  • The R5 can record DCI 8K 12bit raw internally, while Sony will export 16-bit 4.2K raw signal.
  • Both cameras offer fullframe 4K up to 120p with 10-bit 4:2:2.
  • Sony has no recording limits for video.
  • Both have log and HDR profiles; however, Sony's profiles claim 15+ stops of dynamic range.
  • Sony's viewfinder is better, but Canon has a larger screen. You can probably just say these cancel out.
  • Autofocus systems should provide similar performance with matched features.
  • Both use some variant of CFexpress and SD.

Final Thoughts: This is a weird one for sure. Canon has some much better specs for sure on paper, but usability is a concern. There are recording limits, the files sizes can be massive, and overheating already had to be addressed by Canon. However, the R5 is a better all-around camera. So, if you need something for stills and video, the R5 is a great choice because of its higher resolution sensor. If video is your game, the a7S III's practicality is going to serve you significantly better.

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a7S III versus Sony a7 III

Now we have to get into the Sony versus Sony comparisons. I saved these for a little bit later in the list because Sony has explicitly said that the a7S is the video-centric model, so it's going to be better than the others. This will be a more holistic comparison where we talk about who would be better served by each camera, starting with the a7 III.

a7S III versus Sony a7 III

a7S III

Feature

a7 III

12MP BSI Full-Frame CMOS

Sensor

24MP BSI Full-Frame CMOS

Sony E

Lens Mount

Sony E

4K up to 120p

Video Resolution

4K up to 30p

10-bit 4:2:2

Color Depth

8-bit 4:2:0

4K (16-bit) up to 60p via HDMI

Raw Video

None

ISO 80-102400

(Extended: ISO 40-409600)

Sensitivity

ISO 100-51200

(Extended: ISO 50-204800)

5-Axis In-Body (5.5 Stops)

Stabilization

5-Axis In-Body (5 Stops)

None

Recording Limits

Yes, 30 minutes

S-Log2, S-Log3, HLG

Other Video Features

S-Log2, S-Log3, HLG

On-Sensor Phase-Detect

(92% coverage, 759 points)

Autofocus

On-Sensor Phase-Detect

(93% coverage, 693 points)

9.44m-dot OLED EVF

Viewfinder

2.36m-dot OLED EVF

3.0" Articulating Touchscreen

Screen

3.0" Tilting Touchscreen

2 x CFexpress Type A/SD

Media

2 x SD

  • Both sensors use backilluminated architecture, with the a7 III leading in resolution at 24MP and the a7S III's 12MP sensor dominating in lowlight performance.
  • For video, the a7 III might be able to produce more detail as it downsamples from 6K, while the a7S III is using 1:1 pixel readout.
  • The a7S III excels in every other video spec, with 4K 120p, 10bit 4:2:2 internal, raw output, and plenty more.
  • AF systems are similar on both.
  • The a7S III has no recording limit.
  • Videographers will love the new fully articulating screen of the a7S III and highres EVF.
  • The a7S III introduces a new touchcapable menu system for faster, easier navigation.
  • CFexpress cards open the door for faster transfer speeds without giving up the option to use SD.
  • Every other aspect of the a7S III is an improvement over the a7 III.
  • The a7 III is much more affordable.

Final Thoughts: This comparison was easy. If you need or want the best video, the a7S III is the only choice. However, the a7 III is much cheaper and will better suit people who want to shoot both stills and video with its reasonable 24MP resolution. I would say the a7 III still has a very solid place based on its price point, and if you are still just getting started in video, or perhaps are more of a photographer, then the a7 III is a better choice. It can also work still as a B camera for the a7S III if you decide to upgrade or add to your kit in the future.

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a7S III versus Sony a7S II

Okay, I guess we have to do this comparison. But, it's a blowout in every sense. The a7S III trounces its predecessor the a7S II in every single way. This is really to take a deeper look at where it wins.

a7S III versus a7S II

a7S III

Feature

a7S II

12MP BSI Full-Frame CMOS

Sensor

12MP Full-Frame CMOS

Sony E

Lens Mount

Sony E

4K up to 120p

Video Resolution

4K up to 30p

10-bit 4:2:2

Color Depth

8-bit 4:2:0

4K (16-bit) up to 60p via HDMI

Raw Video

None

ISO 80-102400

(Extended: ISO 40-409600)

Sensitivity

ISO 100-102400

(Extended: ISO 50-409600)

5-Axis In-Body (5.5 Stops)

Stabilization

5-Axis In-Body (4.5 Stops)

None

Recording Limits

Yes, 30 minutes

S-Log2, S-Log3, HLG

Other Video Features

S-Log2, S-Log3

On-Sensor Phase-Detect

(92% coverage, 759 points)

Autofocus

Contrast-Detect (169 points)

9.44m-dot OLED EVF

Viewfinder

2.36m-dot OLED EVF

3.0" Articulating Touchscreen

Screen

3.0" Tilting LCD

2 x CFexpress Type A/SD

Media

1 x SD

  • Both are fullframe sensors with the same sensitivity range; however, the a7S III uses a new backilluminated design that means better dynamic range, readout speeds, and lowlight performance.
  • Both do 4K, and do it well, but the a7S III upgrades to 10bit 4:2:2 and can hit 120p.
  • The image stabilization has improved to 5.5 stops from 4.5 stops on the a7S II.
  • Phasedetect AF comes to the a7S III for fast, responsive focusing.
  • The a7S III's EVF gets a major resolution boost and the screen is both touch sensitive and fully articulating.
  • Raw video output via the fullsize HDMI is a first for Sony with the a7S III.
  • Another first is the use of CFexpress Type A while still retaining full SD compatibility.

Final Thoughts: What do you really need to know about the a7S III compared to its predecessor? It's better in every way, and if you want the latest and greatest video, you should upgrade. Don't worry, the a7S II is still a good pick for the price, but seriously consider stepping up if filmmaking is your goal.

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a7S III versus Sony a7R IV

This comparison pits the video-centric a7S III up against the stills powerhouse that is the a7R IV. Honestly, these serve two very different markets. The a7S III is for video-first users looking for top-tier 4K specs and some photo in a pinch. The a7R IV is the opposite, delivering class-leading resolution and autofocus with decent video for hybrid use.

a7S III versus a7R IV

a7S III

Feature

a7R IV

12MP BSI Full-Frame CMOS

Sensor

61MP BSI Full-Frame CMOS

Sony E

Lens Mount

Sony E

4K up to 120p

Video Resolution

4K up to 30p

10-bit 4:2:2

Color Depth

8-bit 4:2:0

4K (16-bit) up to 60p via HDMI

Raw Video

None

ISO 80-102400

(Extended: ISO 40-409600)

Sensitivity

ISO 100-32000

(Extended: ISO 50-204800)

5-Axis In-Body (5.5 Stops)

Stabilization

5-Axis In-Body (5.5 Stops)

None

Recording Limits

None

S-Log2, S-Log3, HLG

Other Video Features

S-Log2, S-Log3, HLG

On-Sensor Phase-Detect

(92% coverage, 759 points)

Autofocus

On-Sensor Phase-Detect

(87% coverage, 567 points)

9.44m-dot OLED EVF

Viewfinder

5.76m-dot OLED EVF

3.0" Articulating Touchscreen

Screen

3.0" Tilting Touchscreen

2 x CFexpress Type A/SD

Media

2 x SD

  • The key difference is the sensor, with the a7R IV boasting a 61MP resolution and the a7S III offering a modest 12MP resolution.
  • The a7S III offers notably better lowlight performance.
  • The a7R IV can capture lots more detail.
  • For video, the a7S III is a clear winner, with 10bit 4:2:2 4K up to 120p. The a7R IV is limited to 4K 30p in 8-bit 4:2:0.
  • Cropping is much more viable on the a7R IV, adding to versatility.
  • Both have solid autofocus systems and inbody image stabilization.

Final Thoughts: Different cameras for different folks. If you are a photographer first, then the a7R IV will make more sense. The extra resolution combined with tons of other solid performance will make it a great option. Videographers and filmmakers will be much better suited to picking up the a7S III with its plenty of upgrades.

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a7S III versus FUJIFILM X-T4

This is a tough comparison, as the FUJIFILM X-T4 has a smaller APS-C sensor instead of the full-frame options found in all the other cameras listed above. It does take advantage of that sensor size to create a smaller, yet still super-capable stills and video system that comes in at a much more affordable price point.

a7S III versus FUJIFILM X-T4

a7S III

Feature

X-T4

12MP BSI Full-Frame CMOS

Sensor

26MP BSI APS-C CMOS

Sony E

Lens Mount

FUJIFILM X

4K up to 120p

Video Resolution

4K up to 60p

10-bit 4:2:2

Color Depth

10-bit 4:2:0

4K (16-bit) up to 60p via HDMI

Raw Video

None

ISO 80-102400

(Extended: ISO 40-409600)

Sensitivity

ISO 160-12800

(Extended: ISO 80-51200)

5-Axis In-Body (5.5 Stops)

Stabilization

5-Axis In-Body (6.5 Stops)

None

Recording Limits

Yes, 30 minutes

S-Log2, S-Log3, HLG

Other Video Features

F-Log, Film Simulations

On-Sensor Phase-Detect

(92% coverage, 759 points)

Autofocus

On-Sensor Phase-Detect

(425 points)

9.44m-dot OLED EVF

Viewfinder

3.69m-dot OLED EVF

3.0" Articulating Touchscreen

Screen

3.0" Articulating Touchscreen

2 x CFexpress Type A/SD

Media

2 x SD

  • Sensor size is a key differentiator, with the XT4 opting for APS-C and the a7S III going for full-frame.
  • Advantages of the a7S III's larger, 12MP sensor include superior lowlight performance and faster readout.
  • The a7S III can hit higher frame rates, up to 120p in 4K.
  • Both offer internal 10bit recording, though the a7S III has full 10bit 4:2:2 internally and no recording limits.
  • The a7S III steps up externally with 16bit raw output.
  • Autofocus will hopefully be close between them, but Sony's is more mature at this point.
  • Image stabilization is interesting, as the smaller format of FUJIFILM cameras permits greater IS performance.
  • The XT4 has a smaller form factor than the a7S III. The entire X System has smaller products.
  • The XT4 is much more affordable.

Final Thoughts: If you are looking to build out a new system for the first time, you can't go wrong with either the FUJIFILM X-T4 or Sony a7S III. However, if you are limited by budget, the X-T4 comes in with a top-notch feature set at a much more affordable price. Of course, there is no upgrade path to full-frame for FUJIFILM, so if you must have full-frame, you'll have to stick with Sony. Arguably, Sony does provide more in the a7S III than the X-T4, though at a higher cost. For the best, go with the a7S.

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a7S III versus Blackmagic Design Pocket Cinema Camera 6K

As the a7S III is going after a now quite large compact cinema camera market, it would only make sense to look at some other cameras in the space, like the Blackmagic Design Pocket Cinema Camera 6K. It's a Super 35mm camera, but it is one of the most feature-packed cameras you can get for video. It's also quite well priced.

a7S III versus Blackmagic Design Pocket Cinema Camera 6K

a7S III

Feature

PCC 6K

12MP BSI Full-Frame CMOS

Sensor

21MP Super 35mm CMOS

Sony E

Lens Mount

Canon EF

4K up to 120p

Full HD up to 240p

Video Resolution

6K up to 50p

5.7k up to 60p

4K up to 60p

2.8K up to 120p

10-bit 4:2:2

Color Depth

10-bit 4:2:2

4K (16-bit) up to 60p via HDMI

Raw Video

6K up to 50p

6K 2.4:1 up to 60p

5.7K up to 60p

ISO 80-102400

(Extended: ISO 40-409600)

Sensitivity

ISO 100-25600

5-Axis In-Body (5.5 Stops)

Stabilization

None

None

Recording Limits

None

S-Log2, S-Log3, HLG

Other Video Features

Dual Native ISO

Mini-XLR Audio Input

3.5mm Stereo Input (TC)

On-Sensor Phase-Detect

(92% coverage, 759 points)

Autofocus

Limited

9.44m-dot OLED EVF

Viewfinder

None

3.0" Articulating Touchscreen

Screen

5.0" Fixed Touchscreen

2 x CFexpress Type A/SD

Media

1 x CFast 2.0

1 x SD

USB-C (SSD Support)

  • Fullframe or Super 35mm; that's your sensor choice. The a7S III has a larger, lowerresolution 12MP full-frame sensor that is better in low light. The Pocket 6K's Super 35mm sensor offers more resolution.
  • The a7S III's mirrorless body has a few advantages: advanced autofocus, inbody image stabilization, a high-res EVF, and more.
  • The Pocket 6K, being built for video alone, has 12bit internal raw recording up to 6K and 10-bit 4K recording in ProRes up to 60p. Both are incredible specs. Add on a timecode input and USBC for recording to external SSDs and you have a very capable compact cinema system.
  • The a7S III doesn't have the same resolutions, but has faster 4K at up to 120p while keeping 10bit 4:2:2 in various compressed formats.
  • The a7S III excels in lowlight performance by multiple stops.
  • Blackmagic offers Dual Native ISO to boost lowlight performance.
  • Sony's claimed dynamic range of 15+ stops beats Blackmagic's claim of 13 stops.
  • Sony uses the more versatile Sony E mount, which can accept adapted lenses from almost any system, while the Pocket 6K uses the more common Canon EF mount.

Final Thoughts: I would honestly give the win to the a7S III if I was picking a straight-up winner right now. The full-frame sensor offers plenty of advantages, and Sony has some very useful additions (IBIS and AF) that make video shooting a more enjoyable experience. Its 4K should also be noticeably better. Blackmagic still offers a lot, in a smaller, more affordable package as expected. The Pocket 6K is an incredibly powerful filmmaking tool, and if you are a fan of Blackmagic's systems or want internal raw it makes sense for the price. It also is a better B camera to other Blackmagic cameras, such as the URSA.

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a7S III versus Sony FX9

Okay, this one is just for fun. The FX9 is Sony's impressive full-frame cinema camera, and it's a doozy. Now, it is in a different class than the a7S III, but it is interesting to see where the tiny camera excels and where the cinema camera comes in handy.

a7S III versus Sony FX9

a7S III

Feature

FX9

12MP BSI Full-Frame CMOS

Sensor

24MP BSI Full-Frame CMOS

Sony E

Lens Mount

Sony E

4K up to 120p

Video Resolution

4K up to 60p

10-bit 4:2:2

Color Depth

10-bit 4:2:2

4K (16-bit) up to 60p via HDMI

Raw Video

4K (16-bit) via firmware

ISO 80-102400

(Extended: ISO 40-409600)

Sensitivity

ISO 800/4000 (Base)

5-Axis In-Body (5.5 Stops)

Stabilization

None

None

Recording Limits

None

S-Log2, S-Log3, HLG

Other Video Features

S-Log3, S-Cinetone

Dual Native ISO

4-128 Stop Electronic ND

XLR Inputs

On-Sensor Phase-Detect

(92% coverage, 759 points)

Autofocus

On-Sensor Phase-Detect

(95% coverage, 561 points)

9.44m-dot OLED EVF

Viewfinder

None

3.0" Articulating Touchscreen

Screen

3.5" Articulating Touchscreen

2 x CFexpress Type A/SD

Media

2 x XQD

1 x SD

  • Both offer backilluminated full-frame sensors; however, the FX9 uses a higher resolution 24MP sensor for 6K downsampling and viable Super 35mm 4K modes.
  • Both offer advanced 4K recording at high frame rates, but the FX9 offers higher quality XAVCI and XAVC-L codecs by default.
  • The FX9 packs in an electronic variable ND filter.
  • Other advantages of the FX9 include networking, true timecode support, SCinetone, Dual Native ISO, and a top handle with XLR inputs.
  • Autofocus should be surprisingly similar between the two models.
  • The FX9's larger, cinefocused body design offers more controls for faster operation.
  • The FX9 has prolevel outputs, such as SDI, in addition to HDMI.
  • Both shockingly have a claimed dynamic range of 15+ stops.

Final Thoughts: If you need a pro cinema camera and are looking at Sony, the FX9 is the one to get here. However, if you already have an FX9, the similarities between it and the a7S III mean it will make a great, compact B camera on set, especially since it will be able to share lenses and other capabilities. I think the a7S III is now a solid part of Sony's cinema ecosystem, even if it doesn't compare when it comes to professional workflows.

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Sony Alpha a7S III Mirrorless Digital Camera

What are your thoughts on this comparison? Anything you think we missed and want us to add? Which of these comparisons would you most like to see turn into a true hands-on comparison when the opportunity arises? Be sure to let us know in the Comments, below!

14 Comments

Hey i i would like to see a comparison between the a7siii and the fs5ii 

You can also put bitrate infos for better understanding.thnks

In the comparison with the FX9 you should mention that it does 'kind of' have image stabilisation, via giroscopic metadata and the Catalyst software. The results look pretty good, and Sony say there will be plugins for NLEs soon. For documentary makers I think this will be a game changer.

My only question here is...  We know it's awesome in low light but how well would this camera work in bright outdoor conditions?  I work in the outdoors hunting/fishing industry so having a camera with seriously low light capabilities is absolutely paramount.  It's always been a challenge until now.  But... when the sun gets high and you need to use an ND filter, how well does this camera stack up to others in its class?

There is no built-in ND filter, so you’ll still need to use an ND filter in bright conditions if you are planning to stick to 180-degree shutter.

If you wanted to bump up the shutter speed and stick to a standard profile the ability to drop down to ISO 80 will allow you to get away without using one though and the footage still looks great with very good dynamic range (max dynamic range is around ISO 640 in S-Log3 still).

You should mention that bmpcc6k can do 2.8k at 120 fps...also it says the bmpcc6k is 8 bit, which is simply wrong.

Hi Samuel,

Thanks for letting us know. That’s what I get for trying to build so many charts very quickly. It has all been corrected. (I put it at 10-bit, since to get higher you’ll need raw which is a different spec).

UPD

Wrong data!

Canon R5 shoots max [email protected], not 60fps.

We appreciate letting us know and the error was corrected after your initial comment. Thank you.

Wrong data!

Canon R5 shoots max [email protected], not 60fps.

Canon R5 media is CFexpress Type A, not Type B.

You are correct about the 4K at 120. Typo on my part. Thank you.

However, the CFexpress on the R5 is definitely Type B.

Compare it to DSC-RX10 III. Where are the Specs? How much does it weigh? The DSC-RX10 III is the heaviest weight with the largest zoom I can use for video. I have been waiting for the a7S III features. But need to know more if moving to a body-only camera and getting a lens to match 600 zoom that I now enjoy.

Good thought for a comparison. My initial points would be that the a7S III with an equivalent 600mm zoom will be multiple times the weight however. And you wouldn’t be able to get a single lens with the same lens. You would need multiple lenses to cover well. It’ll be much higher quality than the RX10 III, but a lot more to work with.

Thanks Shawn. That covers my fears. I wonder if Sony will ever come out with a DSC-RX10 V that is the same weight and zoom lens but has the touch screen focus with image tracking (wow!!!), low light features, and image stabilization I need. Or how about a kit lens like the RX10 that would come with the a7S III. It isn't the money, it is what I can hike with that matters.

I will like to see both A9 compared here.

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