Some Good News for Photographers and Filmmakers Who Use Drones

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Professional Photographers of America (PPA) has been pressing the FAA to ease commercial-use restrictions for professional photographers who wish to use UAVs in their work. The organization is optimistic we are getting close to a new FAA ruling that will allow select industries to operate RC and autonomous aircraft legally, among them filmmaking and certain types of photography, farming, and smokestack inspection.

This does not mean carte blanche license to fly. A number of limitations will be enforced, including a maximum weight of less than 55 lb, that visual line-of-sight (VLOS) be maintained, and that the vehicle not be operated above any persons who are not part of the operation—i.e., random members of the public. Additionally, it looks like some form of licensing and testing for the pilot/operator will be required, though my impression is this will not be as stringent as a license to fly "full scale", manned aircraft.

Many of these details are expected to be hashed out in meetings this week. Hopefully, quite soon we will have a much clearer picture of where the professional light-UAV operator stands, legally.

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I would like to use my drone for aerial photography work, the phantom 3 capabilities, AMAZING I love this aircraft.

HELLO ALL!

THE FAA REQUIRES A WRITEN TEST TO OBTAIN THE UAS OPERATOR'S LICENSE.

THIS TEST INCLUDES AND NOT LIMITED TO: AIRSPACE, AVIATION WEATHER, AERODINAMICS, REGULATIONS, PRIVILIGES AND LIMITATIONS, CHARS AND MAPS ETC.

I AM A ASISTANT CHIEF INSTRUCTOR AND I HAVE AIRLINE TRASPORT PILOT CERTIFICATE, I TOOK THE SAMPLE TEST ( LICENSE PILOTS DO NOT NEED TO TAKE THE TEST) AND IT WAS LIKE WHEN I TOOK MY PRIVATE WRITEN TEST. SO, THAT BEEN SAID MAKE SURE YOU GUYS STUDY WEEL BEFORE GOING FOR THE EXAM.

THE GOOD NEWS IS THAT THE USE OF DRONES FOR REVENUE IS ALLOWED AS LONG AS THE REGULATIONS ARE COMPLIED WITH.

I'M TEACHING A ONE DAY CLASS TO PREPARE COUPLE OF MY CHURCH FRIENS FOR THE TEST, IN WHICH I'M COVERING EVERITHING FOR THE TEST AND TO OPERATE THE UAS WITHIN REGULATION.

I am a multi engine IFR rated Pilot.  Do I need to take the test or is my pilot liscense enough to fly a drone?

Hi David - 

The FAA has modified  many of their rules and regulations since this announcement was posted.  Please check with the FAA directly regarding your credentials:

https://www.faa.gov/uas/getting_started/fly_for_fun/

https://www.faa.gov/uas/getting_started/fly_for_work_business/

howwww...great!!!!

I live in Anchorage, Alaska, one of the busiest airspaces in the world. We have 4 airports, 2 military bases, and a beehive of private bush planes that fly over my home hourly. My drone can skyrocket into the "danger zone" regardless of where I am in the city. Even a remote football field, closed school, or outdoor park is a potentail source of concern once you reach a certain altitude.

I love creativity and all the options shooting from these vantage points offers, however, I have become very aware of the havoc, accident or insurance liability such a device can create. Use with discretion! Learn the controls with patience and stay away from people, pets and powerlines. You will enjoy the experience with much greater ease.

looking forward for additional info, I am interested in the use of Drones for Photo work

quero saber quando estiver dispónivel

Great!

I am very much interested in the use of Drones for Photo work, real state, farm applications.

Thanks for the update, looking forward for additional info.

Let me know if it is available for preordering. Thanks

There is not any particular/specific product being discussed here in this article.  The article is just a news piece on a topic about drones within the photo/video industry. 

Let me know if it is available for preordering. Thanks

"Professional" photographers?

Remember the old days? When the word, "profession", meant and was limited to the practice of such things as medicine, law, and architecture? Now, it means doing ANYTHING for money. Thus, the only non-professionals are the chronically unemployed.

It's interesting the nerves that can be struck by referring to oneself as a professional photographer.  I went to a University and majored in radio and television and minored in photography.  After receivomg my Bachelors degree and putting together the necessary equipment that met accepted "Professional standards,"  I advertised the opening of my business as a professional videographer and photographer.  I assumed that by my training and the skilled use of my equipment that I was ready to start charging the public for my products and services. I was a "Professional."  I even joined the Professional Photographers of America to take advantage of the seminars and the stimulating exchange of ideas contributing to the profession.  After I had been practicing my art for several years, I had a client tell me she had gone to a woman who did photography part-time and that  was shooting weddings for a ridiculously low sum of money.  After viewing her work, my client told her that she really preferred someone who was a full-time professional to shoot her wedding.  The part-timers reply was, "if you prefer a "Professional" (she raised both hands and used her fingers to indiicate quotation marks) then go ahead and pay more" to a "Professional," again using her hands to express quotations. Her attempt to denigrate professionals fell flat on my client.  Several months later the part-timer simply drifted away and left several of her clients without their precious wedding photos.  She also failed to make several of the weddings she contracted to do because her full-time job required she work on key weekends.  Once, so the story goes, her only camera that she shot with failed to function properly on the job and she didn't have a backup. There is a good reason people designate themselves "Professional."  With countless folks with easy to shoot digital cameras anyone can feel they are ready to take on a "professional" assignment.  Unfortunately the public is more interested in pricing than either performance or quality or surety.  The reason I call myself a professional is, damnit, because I am one.

Well stated indeed. I am also a professional; in Computer Science that is. This affords me the resources to purchase some pretty good equipment for shooting my son's golf tournaments. And I do a pretty decent job at it. I once had a guy, who saw my work, ask if I would do the same for his son's golf tournaments and what I would charge. I referred him to a friend of mine, who is an actual professional videographer, meaning, he does it for his living. The guy insisted that my work was good enough to charge money for. I insisted right back that he contact my friend, who is, you guessed it, a "professional" videographer. So I totally agree with you blake.

Blake, your career history and your "professional" attributes has nothing to do with the news discussion here presented.

Ed wrote:

Blake, your career history and your "professional" attributes has nothing to do with the news discussion here presented.

I agree.  Go use Facebook if you need attention.

remember the old days....

sure don't, what I can tell about the "old days" is it allowed racisim, misogyny and bigotry to run out of control.  The last thing I care about is somantics about who is or isn't in a profession. Guess what, "test pilot", drones and the pilots that employ their use are slowly replacing you. I guess you'll need a new profession. er job... 

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