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Rollei Infrared 400 Black and White Negative Film (120 Roll Film, Boxed)

BH #ROIF120BW400 • MFR #8104120
Rollei
Rollei Infrared 400 Black and White Negative Film (120 Roll Film, Boxed)
Key Features
  • IR-Sensitive Panchromatic B&W Neg. Film
  • ISO 400/27° without Filtration
  • Infrared Sensitivity Up to 820nm
  • Very Wide Exposure Latitude
Rollei/Agfa's Infrared 400 is a unique infrared-sensitized panchromatic black and white negative film with a nominal sensitivity of ISO 400/27° without filtration. It is sensitive to IR wavelengths up to 820nm and can be used to produce unique halation effects with filtration and by varying the exposure length. It is suitable for working in both daylight and tungsten conditions and is characterized by a fine grain structure, notable sharpness, and high resolving power. Additionally, a good contrast profile offers clear separation between shadow and highlight regions. The film's polyester base has been tested to an LE-500 (life expectancy 500 years) archival rating and also features anti-curling and anti-static coatings, as well as a special coating to promote smooth film transportation within the camera. Additionally, this clear base is particularly well-suited to scanning applications.
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Rollei Infrared 400 Overview

Rollei/Agfa's Infrared 400 is a unique infrared-sensitized panchromatic black and white negative film with a nominal sensitivity of ISO 400/27° without filtration. It is sensitive to IR wavelengths up to 820nm and can be used to produce unique halation effects with filtration and by varying the exposure length. It is suitable for working in both daylight and tungsten conditions and is characterized by a fine grain structure, notable sharpness, and high resolving power. Additionally, a good contrast profile offers clear separation between shadow and highlight regions. The film's polyester base has been tested to an LE-500 (life expectancy 500 years) archival rating and also features anti-curling and anti-static coatings, as well as a special coating to promote smooth film transportation within the camera. Additionally, this clear base is particularly well-suited to scanning applications.

This item is one boxed roll of 120 format roll film.

Rollei Infrared 400 Specs

Film Format120
Film TypeB&W Infrared
Film SpeedISO 400
Film ProcessingStandard Black and White Chemistry
Film BasePolyester
Number of Rolls1
Layer Thickness100.0 µm
Resolution160 lines/mm (At Contrast 1000:1)
GranularityRMS = 11
Packaging Info
Package Weight0.065 lb
Box Dimensions (LxWxH)3.05 x 1.2 x 1.15"

Rollei Infrared 400 Reviews

Rollei Infrared 120 B&W Film

By Scott
Rated 5 out of 5
Date: 2021-12-31

In my opinion, the best 120 infrared film on the market.

backordered film

By Vince
Rated 4 out of 5
Date: 2021-03-20

My Rollei IR 120 was back ordered, but was finally back in stock, sent and received. Packaged very well. Thanks B&H

Great stuff!

By Steven
Rated 5 out of 5
Date: 2021-02-18

I have used this in 35mm before, but now I've finally managed to shoot the 120 size. Developed in Ilfosol-3, the images were dark but still usable. Probably a screw-up by me somewhere along the way, as the 35mm roll was processed in the same developer and it came out great. I will be shooting more of this film come summer!

High speed with Xtol

By Kelvin
Rated 5 out of 5
Date: 2020-01-01

As of this review (Jan 2020) I've shot 19 rolls of Rollei Infrared in medium format (Mamiya 6) developed with Xtol 1 1 @ 17 min 68F and exposed through orange 16, red 25, red 29 and Hoya IR72 filters. Metering was done using a Minolta spotmeter F. This film is high contrast without filters but makes for a great everyday 400 iso film, it's grain is comparable to ilford delta 100 but a bit more fine and tighter. With my meter and processing this film actually yeilds a speed rating of 600 iso for normal exposure and 100 iso for infrared use. These ratings are determined with a 1 degree spot meter and I place the highlights as a priority and let the shadows fall where they may, usually in blackness but that's the look I came to this film for. The high red sensitivity of this film means that a red 29 filter only requires only 1-1/2 stops of compensation for me and makes a small amount of the wood effect visible which gives a beautiful look to we'll composed omages. With some testing and extensive note taking I will share what I've learned about this film thus far: 1- Does not suffer fools well, keep your process well controlled and chemistry clean and fresh. 2- Does not like acid, I use a water rinse no stop bath and TF-4 fixer. I was getting pin holes in the emulsion and they all stopped after removing acid from stop/fix. Xtol doesn't seem to cause problems even though it's an acid containing developer. 3- Don't squeegee or wipe this film, the emulsion is easy to scratch and difficult to retouch. Distilled water with fotoflo rinse and hang to dry, this film dries very fast on its own (30 min hanging in my dry box, no heat no fan). 4- if your inexperienced loading stainless steel reels practice beforehand, this film has a thin base and doesn't load well on plastic reels sO don't waste your time. This film is likely to be misunderstood by beginners, it's merits require skill to use and experience to exploit with any competency. That said, I love this film.

Rollei IRnirvana

By Peter
Rated 5 out of 5
Date: 2021-10-17

Just amazingly wonderful results when shot with Hoya R72 and metered at ISO 6. Example can be seen here. https://peter-herman.pixels.com/featured/solitude-at-allen-creek-infrared-black-and-white-film-image-at-lake-leota-park-in-evansville-wi-peter-herman.html

Timely Delivery for a Hard-to-Source Product

By Douglas
Rated 5 out of 5
Date: 2021-09-30

I have had difficulty locating a source for this specialty film and was please that B&H was able provide it to me timely and at a reasonable price.

Infrared film for 35mm and 120

By Marion
Rated 5 out of 5
Date: 2021-08-23

This ISO 400 film works beautifully with a #25 red filter (factor of 6). It has a broad latitude and can be loaded in subdued light.

Good IR-like Film

By Ari
Rated 5 out of 5
Date: 2021-06-07

It's like IR film without actually being an IR film. Still, it's the best we have now, so let's all use it and keep it going as long as possible. It's sharp, dreamy, contrasty and surreal, though not at the same time. The look really depends on filtration and developer. I use an R72 filter so that shutter speeds are reasonable (1/30s). Anything stronger and you'd need a tripod all the time. I've been using HC-110 (B) and Dektol at low dilutions. There's lots of room for experimentation with this film. Also use it, and prefer it, in 35mm, where you can see a little more grain.

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YOUR RECENTLY VIEWED ITEMS

How would exposure & auto-metering be affected if ...

How would exposure & auto-metering be affected if used with a 720 nm filter over a flash head?
Asked by: Paolo
Based on the spectral output of a xenon flash and the sensitivity range of this film, you would probably be looking at the exposure being about 2-3 stops below the meter reading. So giving it +2 or 3 stops of exposure compensation would likely be a good starting place.
Answered by: Anonymous
Date published: 2020-01-23

Red or infrared filters are necesary ?,or without ...

Red or infrared filters are necesary ?,or without it?
Asked by: juan gerardo
With the red filter it tends to give better definition and a bit less contrast which tends to be more pleasing to the eye I find. The filters are not necessary but they do help a bit.
Answered by: Zachariah
Date published: 2021-02-17

question

What precautions if any I have to take before loading the IR film in the camera and also before I develop?
Asked by: Manojchandra
I have used both 120 and 35 mm, loading and unloading in very dim light and never had a problem.
Answered by: Robert H.
Date published: 2018-08-26

question

Is there any company that will develop infrared film?
Asked by: Anonymous
Black and white infrared film is developed in the same chemicals as any other black and white film. You should be able to have it developed anywhere that processes true black and white negs.
Answered by: David P.
Date published: 2018-08-26

question

I'm developing this film in my darkroom. Usually I use T-max developer. What are you using to develop this film and any info on time and concentrate?
Asked by: mary s.
Per instructions inside box, I use D-76 developer at 1+1 dilution, 10:50 seconds development time. Great results with this film every time.
Answered by: Elsa M.
Date published: 2018-08-26

question

I am loading the 120 size Rollei 400 infrared in a pinhole camera (6x6 size) but I don't see any frame numbers on the backing paper. Does it have any? If not, can you recommend how often to turn the film to the next frame?
Asked by: Rosemary
Hey there brave soul of infrared endeavours! There are numbers on the film itself, pretty sure not on the backing. You will need to measure turns to get 6 centimeters. I would take strip of paper and measure 6cm on it and see how many turns will give you 6cm and a bit. Other than that, use complete darkness for loading/unloading too. Hope this helps :)
Answered by: Phil T.
Date published: 2018-08-26
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