Yankee Cut Film Daylight Developing Tank

Yankee Cut Film Daylight Developing Tank

Yankee Cut Film Daylight Developing Tank

B&H # YATCF MFR # CF-45
Yankee Cut Film Daylight Developing Tank

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  • 1Description

The Yankee Cut Film Daylight Developing Tank has an improved design that provides for better chemical flow and more uniform agitation.

The removable rack accommodates cut film from 2-1/4  x  3-1/4" to 4 x 5". The rack has a translucent flange and a film guide for easy loading. Comes complete with instructions.

UPC: 043953036450
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  • 1Description
Packaging Info
Package Weight 1.65 lb
Box Dimensions (LxWxH) 8.7 x 6.7 x 6.3"
Cut Film Daylight Developing Tank is rated 3.7 out of 5 by 38.
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Yankee Agitank I've been processing sheet film in trays for many years. recently I acquired a 6x9 cm Century Graphic and knew tray processing small sheet film was impractical and I would need a daylight tank. I had a Yankee Agitank years ago and got another one because the film guides can be set at sizes from 6 cm to 4 inches. It works very well. You need to be careful not to over agitate, and I found the best solution is to use a low activity developer such as D-23. Using the loading guide takes a bit of a learning curve.
Date published: 2008-07-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great product if used correctly. This developing tank is great if you do the following: 1. Super glue the sliding (white) part of the film holder in the position you will be using it. Otherwise it will slip and slide all over the place, causing film to become dislodged. 2. Pay attention when loading film. It's in the dark. The film guide has slots that will keep it perpendicular to the bottom and top of the holder if you'll just keep your mind on what you're doing. that will prevent you from misloading film. When you load one sheet, slide the guide into the next osition. Don't forget to do that or you will mess up both sheets of film. 3. This is critical. Ignore the instructions about it being a daylight developing tank. Don't use it that way. Shaning the tank will result in uneven development. develop in total darkness and use the dip and dunk method, lifting the film holder and letting it drain once every minute.. After pouring out the developer you can give the film a rinse, put the top back on, and do the rest in daylight. Of course if you use an A/B developer, like Diafine, you don't need to concern yourself with agitation and can do the whole process with the top on in daylight. that stuff is really cheap to use, by the way since it lasts for years and can be used almost indefinitely. It's real easy to wash and wet the film in this thing. I've had one of these for over 40 years. Maybe they made them sturdier back then (they did everything else). It is in just as good condition as it was when I bought it. It's much easier to load than the older type rubber tanks' holders. It will handle more sheets of fiom than those without using much more fluid (12 4x5 sheets can be developed in a half gallon of fluid). And used as I described it will deliver immaculate negatives. There's no other tank I'd use for my 4x5 films. I'd recommend it to a friend, with these caveats.
Date published: 2012-04-19
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A good addition This tank allows me to process cut film in daylight. If there is an improvement, it would be a more clearly defined stop for different kinds of film. There is a tendency to trap air bubbles in the upper rack, necessitating a stronger than usual shake on original filling with developer.
Date published: 2008-04-29
Rated 4 out of 5 by from The Old Equipment is Still Best Yankee tanks have been a long standing dependable system. The ease of loading, daylight processing, and durability are great. The only drawback is the plastic tank. While a hard rubber tank would cost more, it would stand up better and the OLD version of the film holder had better defined slots for film size. Still, it's the best and perhaps the last in it's class.
Date published: 2008-08-05
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Inexpensive Tank But Uses Lots of Chemicals The tank itself is good and useful. Like other users have mentioned, the top of the holder can slip. I used it successfully, but found the amount of chemicals I used was wasteful so I bought a smaller Jobo that could develop 2-4x5 sheets at one time. I would not use this for 120 film as there are really inexpensive tanks available that use less chemicals. I bought this specifically for 4x5 sheet film. That said, if you are looking for an inexpensive way to develop 4x5 sheets, this does job. You will spend more in chemicals, but they can be had for reasonable prices. Hope this helps.
Date published: 2015-08-26
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Works, with some tweaks Better than to build my own and quite cheap but needs some improvements. I filled half the cavity with wood sealed in plastic to minimise the chemistry needed. I can use 1l to develop 4 4x5. The lid is not watertight, you need to move it sideways for agitation. Since it still leaked (supposed to) I sealed the cover (except the spout) with tape for the development duration. Worked well and allowed me to tilt the tank to the side of the film to ensure proper coverage. Film is easy to install with the guide. Half a tank would be enough. Dvelopper slides with success! Sorry for my english, I speak french..
Date published: 2016-07-08
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Cheap and effective, but... Well made, can be hard to load in the dark, and avoiding to load sheets two times in the same rack needs some practice. This is backelite-like made, and can look cheap-made. Can get messy since it is not water-tight Takes a lot of chemistry. This being said, it leads to uniform results and it is certainly the most effective way to develop 4x5 film
Date published: 2008-09-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great tank I have no absolutely no problems with this tank. Read the directions and you'll be perfectly fine. I definitely prefer this tank over darkroom tanks (I no longer have a darkroom, but this tank is still rpeferable even if I did). It's easy to load, easy to clean, and does a great job of developing without streaking. I will say that I went from a once every minute agitation to a 10sec agitation every 30sec. It seems to work a bit better that way.
Date published: 2013-02-13
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