Kodak 4 x 5" Ektar 100 Color Negative (Print) Film (10 Sheets)

BH #KOE1004510 • MFR #1587484
Kodak
Kodak 4 x 5" Ektar 100 Color Negative (Print) Film (10 Sheets)
Key Features
  • Extremely Sharp
  • Intense Color
  • Can Be Scanned
Kodak 4 x 5" Ektar 100 Color Negative (Print) Film is a wonderful medium speed outdoor film that produces vibrant color and which features smooth, fine grain. Ektar's reputation is world renowned. It is a very sharp and highly saturated film that produces intense color with great contrast. This film can be scanned with no fear of losing detail. Ektar can be used by pro and amateur alike.
In Stock
$44.95
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Kodak Ektar 100 Overview

  • 1Description
  • 2Characteristics
  • 3
  • 4Incorporates Entertainment Imaging's Kodak Vision Film technology
  • 5Micro-Structure Optimized T-Grain Emulsions
  • 6Kodak's Proprietary DIR Couplers

Kodak 4 x 5" Ektar 100 Color Negative (Print) Film is a wonderful medium speed outdoor film that produces vibrant color and which features smooth, fine grain. Ektar's reputation is world renowned. It is a very sharp and highly saturated film that produces intense color with great contrast. This film can be scanned with no fear of losing detail. Ektar can be used by pro and amateur alike.

Characteristics

Extraordinary enlargement capability
Ultra-vivid color

Incorporates Entertainment Imaging's Kodak Vision Film technology

World's finest-grain color negative film

Micro-Structure Optimized T-Grain Emulsions

Ideal for scanning

Kodak's Proprietary DIR Couplers

Distinct edges, fine detail
UPC: 041771587482

Kodak Ektar 100 Specs

Film Size (W x H)4 x 5" / 101.6 x 127 mm
Film TypeColor Negative
Film ProcessingC-41
Film SpeedISO 100
Quantity10 Sheets
Packaging Info
Package Weight0.25 lb
Box Dimensions (LxWxH)5.7 x 4.6 x 0.8"
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YOUR RECENTLY VIEWED ITEMS

I have a 1978 Kodak Pleaser, would this work for ...

I have a 1978 Kodak Pleaser, would this work for it?
Asked by: Katie
No , kodak pleaser is a instant camera , and this is 4x5 film , they are not compatible
Answered by: vilson
Date published: 2021-02-08

question

Will this work for Kodak EK6 instant Camera? It is needing PR10 film.
Asked by: Carrie B.
Sorry, no this is for a 4x5 view camera.
Answered by: Philip C.
Date published: 2018-08-28

question

Does this film work for a Kodak Champ Kodamatic Instant Camera?
Asked by: Anonymous
No
Answered by: Nicolas B.
Date published: 2018-08-28

question

kodak colorburst 250?
Asked by: Anonymous
No. This file is 100 speed film.
Answered by: Craig R.
Date published: 2018-08-28

question

Will this film work in a Kodak ek4 instant camera?
Asked by: Ashley O.
As others have pointed out, this is a conventional color negative film, not an instant film. It will not work in an instant camera.
Answered by: James B.
Date published: 2018-08-28

question

Is this compatible with the Kodak Colorburst 100? If not, is there anything that is?
Asked by: Anonymous
No, this is for 4x5 view cameras; the 'impossible project' makes the poloroid films; BH sells some bw and color poloroid type films, call first to see if this will work. I know it works with the poloriod sx-70 camera..DJ
Answered by: David J.
Date published: 2018-08-28

question

is this film compatible with the colorburst 50 kodak instant film camera?
Asked by: rachel b.
Dear Rachel, The short answer is unfortunately no. While I am wholly uncertain what size instant film your Colorburst 50 camera was designed to expose, I can definitively say that Kodak Ektar 4 x 5, or any other size negative sheet film, will not work as intended in your camera. Kodak Ektar is a relatively new color-negative film available in 35mm and 120 rolls, also 4 x 5 inch and 8 x 10 inch sheets. This wonderful film is normally loaded into sheet film holders in total darkness then placed into the back of a large-format camera; once the image has been composed on it's ground glass and all camera/lens adjustments have been made. After pulling the film holders' dark slide and letting the shutter rip, the holder with it's film is then taken back to the darkness to be processed in C-41 chemistry or the film alone sent off for this leg of the magic act to be wielded by other hands or a machine processor. When this film has been properly handled, loaded, unloaded and even acceptably exposed and processed, you arrive at a usable color negative. I suspect that in the digital world this color film is most often scanned to become very large digital files/positives, as it may have been designed with scanning in mind. While contact prints can be made to the same size of any negative film used, in a traditional darkroom, both color and black & white negative films are normally held in a negative carrier which is placed underneath the light source of a photo enlarger and projected optically onto photographic enlarging paper. The paper is then developed/processed in a why not too dissimilar than that of film. That is, you go from darkness to dim safelight, make use of chemical solutions requiring a somewhat exact combination of dilution, temperature, time, and agitation, to a paper development also with chemicals but allowing for a less stringent course with respect to those variables while giving the same amount of attention to paper exposure as you did with film exposure. Sorry about the long answer but I wouldn't want to discourage anyone investigating the use of film by just saying - good luck with that. Also, forgive me if I've wrongly assumed that you're unfamiliar with basic film/darkroom procedures. The question you asked made me think that you may be new to the use of film, 4 x 5 at that! That's a good thing in my view as I have never stopped using film and Kodak sure doesn't make it or discontinue it based on my use alone. (Hey look at that! Mark just bought another box of film, time to start another batch.) Perhaps you asked the question because you already have a box of 4 x 5 Ektar and a 30 year old instant film camera. In that case, go ahead and experiment if you're able to fit a sheet into the back of your camera. Keep in mind that it must be done in complete darkness and the camera back must also be light-tight. At this point you would be well within the realm of experimentation, though, without a darkroom, you are left with sending it out to be processed. I'm not sure but I think the going rate is around $3.00 a sheet. Truth is, you could expose this film and most other sheet films with something as simple as a pinhole camera made from a shoe box and a pie tin but this is not the norm. 4 x 5 negative film has been a widely available standard size film for over 100 years and the new Ektar 4 x 5 will fit into any new or 100 year old 4 x 5 film holder and those holders will work in just about any 4 x 5 large format film camera ever produced (millions) but I'm afraid the film and camera combination you mention are not a proper pairing. If in fact tangible instant photos are what you're after rather then knowing if the Colorburst 50 will work to expose large-format film, well, as explained above, Kodak Ektar 4 x 5 is anything but instantaneous. Funny, I just googled the Colorburst 50 and Fuji's FP-100c film popped up.It's a 3 X 4 inch 100 speed daylight balanced color instant film. In stock at B&H, 10 shots/instant prints for $20.00 Wish I were knowledgeable enough about your camera and this film to say if it will or will not work but if instant is what you want and you somehow haven't seen this film already, maybe you could look into that further. I hope you find a solution and continue to buy film.Have a good day,Mark
Answered by: MARK A. M.
Date published: 2018-08-28

question

Lightproof pouch: I'm new to large format and am trying to load Ektar for 1st time, and when finding a sealed paper pouch inside instead of a foldable plastic bag like my Ilford film, I was afraid to open it since I'm not loading the whole box and am unsure of proper procedure to protect lightproof storage with this packaging. I'd hate to fog part of my film on my first box. Could you please advise on best practices?
Asked by: Anonymous
Best advice would be to either have someone show you the first time. It's a fiddly process until you get used to it. Next best option is to YouTube it. Watch the videos and practice with spent negs first. Nothing worse than losing a valuable photo becaus you've loaded the film the wrong side out, or have a light leak.
Answered by: Zeyad G.
Date published: 2018-08-28
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