Steadicam Solo Stabilizer & Monopod

Steadicam Solo Stabilizer & Monopod

Steadicam Solo Stabilizer & Monopod

B&H # STSSS MFR # SOLO
No Longer Available

Product Highlights

  • Converts between Steadicam and Monopod
  • 3-Axis Gimbal
  • 10 lb Weight Capacity
  • Telescopically Extends to Four Sections
  • Includes QR Plate and Counterweights
  • Folds to a Portable 24"
  • Supports Optional Arm and Vest
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  • 1Description

The Steadicam Solo Stabilizer & Monopod quickly converts back-and-forth between a Steadicam and monopod, handily providing the functions of both in one portable unit. It features a 3-axis gimbal and supports up to 10 lb. It telescopically extends out to four sections to approximately average shoulder height, and it folds to a compact 24" in length.

Solo is made of all metal and has an ergonomic foam gimbal handle and post control grips. It can be used handheld or with an optional Steadicam arm and vest set. A quick release camera mounting plate and a set of counterweights are included, allowing for out-of-the-box use.

Key Features
  • Converts between a Steadicam and monopod
  • 3-axis gimbal
  • 10 lb weight capacity
  • Folds to a portable 24"
  • Supports optional arm and vest
Removable Stage Design
  • Quick release camera mounting plate
  • Push on lock
  • Push-button release
  • Positive position clamping
  • Standard 1/4"-20 and 3/8"-16 camera mounting
  • Simple dual knob fore-aft vernier adjustment
In the Box
Steadicam Solo Stabilizer & Monopod
  • Quick Release Camera Mounting Plate
  • Set of Counterbalance Weights
  • Limited 1-Year Parts & 6-Month Labor Warranty
  • Table of Contents
    • 1Description
    Folded Dimensions 24 x 3.5" (61 x 9 cm)
    Weight Capacity 10 lb (4.5 kg)
    Packaging Info
    Package Weight 8.5 lb
    Box Dimensions (LxWxH) 27.5 x 8.3 x 6.3"
    Solo Stabilizer & Monopod is rated 4.2 out of 5 by 76.
    Rated 5 out of 5 by from Solidly Built This is a well-built item that deserves at least a trial run. I didn't find it useful as a monopod, and I wish there was a built-in stand instead of the monopod foot. The Solo is really designed for use with the vest and arm, and is too heavy for use for an extended period of time without. In fact, after a single use, I needed to put it down after fifteen minutes and couldn't continue using it that day. However, I like the smoothness and controllability this product offers once the camera is properly balanced without the need for charging batteries. Note that a mirrorless camera such as the Sony a7s ll is too light to properly balance on the Solo without a large lens.
    Date published: 2016-07-27
    Rated 2 out of 5 by from Don't Buy with Rebate, They Won't Honor. 6 months later I'm still waiting for my rebate. Last time I heard from them they said: Due to the overwhelming response to several recent promotions, we currently are processing an extremely high volume of rebate submissions. Unfortunately this has caused delays well beyond our typical 8 week processing time. Regarding the product, it's very very HEAVY almost unusable with a DSLR, unless you put a cheap plastic lens.
    Date published: 2016-06-08
    Rated 3 out of 5 by from Great But Only With Vest & Arm I personally think the Stedicam Solo without the vest and arm is useless and a pain. But, I will have to say that the Solo with the vest and arm is a great addition to the Stedicam family and an independent filmmakers best friend. Now for the cons: Heavy with any camera setup Poor counter balance setup because of limited areas to put weights Awkward weights No place to put weights on the quick release area for compensation Cannot use large diameter lenses on quick release with smaller cameras Quick release area blocks most DSLR camera battery doors The pros: Monopod transformation (but be careful not to lose the foot because it gets easily loose) Great adjustment knobs Quick release plate Sturdy professional build Small and compact design I have used this rig without the vest and arm since it's release and have found many issues when using DSLR Cameras, but since I invested in the rig I took the time to figure out ways around allot of the issues. Now, I've also bought the vest and arm for this rig and allot of the prior issues I've had are now gone. The reason is that the vest and arm like any other stabilizing system will give you some leeway with incorrect balancing, and will drastically extend usage time. If you would like to know more about the pros and cons of the vest and arm, you can read my review under the Stedicam Solo Vest and Arm product profile. I don't recommend this rig to someone who has never used a similar system. I also don't recommend this rig without the vest and arm because it's to heavy to be used for a significant amount of time. (NOTE: Be careful of the weight leg section becoming crooked during use; this can offset the balance of the rig. Now, one can compensate for this by using an allen key (not any of the ones provided) to tighten the area. If one does this they have to loosen the screw before retracting or extending the leg section. I also recommend removing the foot and foot screw before use.)
    Date published: 2015-04-18
    Rated 5 out of 5 by from Brilliant! I think the other reviews have pointed out a number of important details that could be improved, but, overall, this is a fantastic stabilizer. I use the Solo for stabilized, short duration, b-roll shots. You cannot expect to perform long duration shots with a hand held stabilizer. Even a standard DSLR quickly gets heavy. If you are willing to accept that compromise, it is possible for an untrained beginner to get shots that rival the work of a trained, professional Steadicam operator. Pretty amazing.
    Date published: 2015-03-22
    Rated 5 out of 5 by from Steadicam Stabilizer and monopod This stabilizer is obviously very well designed and built. It takes a while to figure out how to balance the camera properly to get the most out of the design. The instructions are lucid, though. Walking with the stabilizer is no small feat, as anybody knows who has taken walking shots. As Tiffen recommends, you need to practice. The secondary use as a monopod is quite easy, and the additional weight and balance weights help in steadying the camera. Most monopods are fairly light. This one gives the advantage of extra weight to brace against while filming. The whole rig (including a Canon XA 20) weighs about 7 lbs. Larger cameras need additional balance weights.
    Date published: 2016-04-03
    Rated 4 out of 5 by from Produces good results The best part of the SOLO is that it produces good results on a very reasonable budget. I use it with with a D800 + Ninja Blade as well as a EOS-M. I am able to get good results with either setup but the smaller EOS-M is probably better suited to a smaller stabilizer. The SOLO handles quite a heavy load and the built-in monopod is actually very useful at times. What I didn't like was the handle. It works fine with the vest but if you ever use it without you better have seriously strong hands. I am a rock climbing and mountaineering guide, I have very strong hands, and yet with my D800 + Ninja Blade, which I would guess is around the middle of the capacity range for the SOLO, I could only do about a 15 minute shot without a significant break. This is not an uncommon situation when shooting documentaries in remote areas. Using the vest eliminates this issue. My other complaint is that it does not get shorter. At times, when shooting down stairs for example, the camera had to be held very far from the body to avoid bumping the stabilizer. Other things: Buy the vest. Most people will need it and everyone will want it. Use a stand, either dedicated or improvised to help with the setup. I often improvise a stand with a trekking pole. The balance is crucial and it will take some practice to get it right. Sometimes I balance it slightly down or up it help get the frame I want for a particular shot without having to manually tilt the stabilizer. Some cameras have built in tools to help with this on others I use a hot-shoe level. Above all, practice before you use it on a job. It has a learning curve.
    Date published: 2015-12-22
    Rated 3 out of 5 by from Too heavy for use without a vest By the time you add a DSLR and lens to it, it becomes too heavy to handle for more than a minute or two. I'm not a weak person, but you shouldn't have to be a body builder to carry this thing. Looks like similar, alternative products weigh several pounds less (not loaded). Also, I read a review somewhere after I purchased this that faster lenses with wider barrels would not fit well on the head. While I personally did not try a 'fast' lens on the rig, I could see how it could create a problem and prevent the camera from sitting flush on the base of the head.
    Date published: 2015-12-10
    Rated 3 out of 5 by from Product is good but requires 1,000 hours of practice I purchased this along with the A-15 Steady CAM vest/arm. It turns out that the movement of the Solo Stabilizer is so free flowing that it is difficult to control camera movement without a Gimbal. I was hoping not to need a gimbal so that I would not hear motor noise or have to worry about batteries. After several attempts, talking to users and watching YouTube videos I learned that you need to attend a special school and practice maybe 1,000 hours to not need a gimbal. Add a gimbal to my Sony FS5 video camera with a 24mm - 70 mm G Master lens and you are close to the weight capacity of the A-15 arm. In the end, I had to return the stabilizer, vest, and mechanical arm.
    Date published: 2016-11-30
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