New from Roland: Fantom Workstations, MC Grooveboxes, and a JU-06A Synthesizer

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Music producers, beatmakers, and electronic musicians across the genre spectrum should be excited about Roland’s latest creations. With three keyboard workstations, two grooveboxes, and one synthesizer, this batch is a big deal for anyone wanting to supercharge their music-making process.

The FANTOM Series of keyboard workstations are available in 61-, 76-, and 88-key versions. The FANTOM-6 and FANTOM-7 feature semi-weighted keys and channel aftertouch, whereas the 88-key FANTOM-8 employs the heralded PHA-50 wood/plastic hybrid keybed with escapement, ebony/ivory feel, and channel aftertouch. Aside from the keybed differences, the three models are identical. Boasting more than 3,500 tones, 90 drum kits, and 16 parts, the expandable ZEN-Core sound engine delivers multiple synthesis types, sampling, and an onboard analog filter. Go for real-time recording with piano-roll editing, switch to grid-based clip sequencing and launching, tap out beats on the RGB pads, or use the classic TR-REC step sequencer to create patterns with per-step automation. There are tons of effects, so you can really nail the sound you’re envisioning in your head. Whether you want to control your soft synths from a touchscreen, trigger analog synths via CV/gate outputs, or stream audio to and from your DAW, the FANTOM keyboard workstations can make it happen.

FANTOM-7
FANTOM-7
FANTOM-8, FANTOM-7, and FANTOM-6
FANTOM-8, FANTOM-7, and FANTOM-6

The new grooveboxes are the 4-track MC-101 and the 8-track MC-707. Both feature 16 RGB pads, up to 16 clips per track, and a ZEN-Core sound generator, which provides 128 voices, 3,000 preset tones, and 80 preset drum kits. Import samples from an SD card, then trigger them or time stretch, pitch shift, and loop them as desired. The MC-101 has a fader for each track, and the MC-707 takes it several steps further with a fader and FX, mod, and filter knobs per track. The MC-101 has capable I/O—stereo main and headphone outputs, MIDI in/out, and USB for audio and MIDI, but the MC-707 tacks on additional assignable stereo outputs, send/return connectivity, and external inputs. The MC-707 uses an AC adapter, while the MC-101 can be powered by batteries or via USB for truly portable operation. Though they have their differences, both grooveboxes contain legendary sounds of past machines and the power to explore brand-new sonic territory through immersive recording, sequencing, tweaking, and mixing.

MC-101
MC-101
MC-707
MC-707

Finally and officially, the synth… Roland’s JU-06A offers the tones, style, and features of the vintage JUNO-60 and JUNO-106 in the form of a compact, portable desktop synthesizer. This 4-voice sound module sports an arpeggiator, a 16-step sequencer, chord memory, and effects including chorus and delay. Connectivity is surprisingly plentiful—USB for audio and MIDI I/O, full-size MIDI input and output ports, and mini-jacks for the external clock input, mix input, main out, and headphone output. Plus, since it can be powered by batteries and has a built-in speaker, the JU-06A can join you anywhere you roam.

JU-06A
JU-06A

It doesn’t matter if you stay in a studio for hours on end, or create song snippets wherever you can, the newest releases from Roland can make your musical compositions even better. Stop by the B&H SuperStore or visit our website to learn more!

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