Voigtlander

Things We Love: Voigtländer VM-E Close Focus Adapter

I always wanted to own a Leica but, cost factors aside, the camera wasn’t right for me because rangefinder cameras simply cannot focus close enough for the kind of in-your-face close-ups I enjoy shooting. I’ve long been a fan of Leica lenses and have shot with many over the years, but the inability to shoot close-ups without having to resort to additional hardware put the kibosh on any further action. Then Sony introduced its Alpha A7-series cameras, which ultimately ended my decades-long love affair with reflex cameras.

Vintage Lens Review: Non-Retrofocus Ultra-Wide-Angle Lenses

When 35mm reflex cameras (SLRs) began arriving on our shores 70-odd years ago, the widest focal length lenses available at the time were 35mm (about 60° AoV). Wider-angle non-retrofocus lenses existed, but because their rear elements back-focused to within 5 to 10mm from the focus plane (film or camera sensor), they proved impractical for use in SLRs, which require 35-40mm of back focus to accommodate the mirror box.

Gearcast: Third-Party Lenses

Today we present our inaugural “Gearcast,” a monthly feature of the B&H Photography Podcast that focuses solely on new cameras, lenses, and photo gear. We have always discussed photography equipment, but the Gearcast is branded to speak to our gear-head cohorts and those looking specifically for an insightful conversation on the latest available cameras, lenses, and accessories and the most appropriate applications for them.

Hurry, Hurry. Get in the Picture.

Let’s say you are at an event like a birthday party, a family reunion, or a holiday get-together, and you want a group photo that includes everyone. No one should be left out just because they have to operate the camera and be the acting photographer. So, what are the options for including the photographer in the shot?

Self-Timers

The first option has played out in so many comedic scenes in movies that it seems like a forgone conclusion that it will end in a botched photo.

Pancake Lens Buying Guide

Pancake lenses, those small, fixed focal length lenses that barely protrude from your camera’s lens mount, are becoming increasingly common. Based on a simple Zeiss Tessar lens design that dates back more than a hundred years, pancake lenses are popular again due to their size—they extend an inch or less from the camera body—and weight, which is usually about 3 ounces.

 

Lenses for the Hybrid Shooter

With high-quality video now standard in DSLRs and mirrorless cameras, a number of hybrid stills/video shooters have popped up. Unfortunately, video and photography have different concerns when it comes to lens selection, and since most of us can’t fork out the dough for two separate lens sets, it is fortunate that lens manufacturers have been working to fill the need of hybrid shooters. If you want lenses that can work for stills and filmmaking, here’s a list of appealing options.

Hands-On Review: Voigtlander Heliar-Hyper Wide 10mm f5.6 ASPH

The new Voigtlander Heliar-Hyper Wide 10mm f5.6 ASPH lens for Sony E-mount cameras isn’t for the faint of heart. It’s not that it will wrestle you to the ground or throw you like a bull in a rodeo; rather, it challenges your skills as a photographer. Speaking as someone who routinely shoots with 15mm rectilinear lenses, Voigtlander’s Heliar-Hyper Wide 10mm f5.6 ASPH is a whole other animal.

Filmmaking Test: How Format Size Affects Your Focal Length

Without a doubt, your focal length choice affects the impact of your image, whether you are shooting video or stills. With the rise of digital imaging, there has been an uptick of available formats in which you can shoot. To help clarify the relationship between format and focal length, some have coined the phrase “35mm equivalent.” This term has value when you are planning a shoot, your lens package, and as an aid for anyone who began their careers using 35mm film and has transitioned to shoot in a new digital format.

Micro Four Thirds Format for Filmmakers

Filmmakers once had a simple choice when it came to the format in which they shot. The two professional formats were 35mm and 16mm—film. 35mm was, and still is, the gold standard, used on big-budget feature films. 16mm was thought of as the more accessible and affordable alternative, used on documentaries and independent films. Deciding to shoot on 16mm rather than 35mm meant using smaller, lighter cameras and spending less money on film.

The State of Mirrorless Glass

With mirrorless digital cameras continuously growing in both popularity and imaging capabilities, their respective lines of lenses are also consistently being multiplied, refined, and expanded in order to better suit the developing range of cameras. At the beginning, mirrorless cameras were considered an intermediary step between full-fledged DSLRs and compact point-and-shoots.

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