Allan Weitz

Allan Weitz

A graduate of the High School of Art and Design and the School of Visual Arts in New York City, Allan Weitz started taking pictures when digital meant doing something with your fingers. Currently the host of the B&H Photography Podcast and a member of the B&H Explora writing team, his work has appeared in (and on the covers of) dozens of publications, including New York magazine, Philadelphia magazine, Esquire, GQ, Yachting, and Nautical Quarterly.

Latest Articles

1 day ago
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Considering how accurate your camera’s light meter is, selling a light meter to a photographer sounds as weaselly as selling ice cubes to an Inuit or Yupik person. In terms of accuracy, the new Sekonic Speedmaster L-858D-U Light Meter can calculate ambient and flash exposures to...
3 weeks ago
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On this month’s “Gearcast” we take a look at wide-aperture, wide-angle lenses. With our guest, Neil Gershman, a lens expert from the B&H Superstore, we touch upon the history of wide-angle lenses, their design and general applications, and then we discuss some pros and cons of wide-angle lenses with maximum apertures wider than f/2. Given the market demand and the technical capability, lens...
4 weeks ago
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If you’re into wider-aperture wide-angle lenses that deliver ridiculously sharp image files (as I am) you’re precisely the person Sigma had in its crosshairs when the company whipped up its latest high-performance hotties—the Sigma 14mm f/1.8 DG HSM ART and...
1 month ago
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Savage has announced a trio of new products for use in the studio, as well as on location. The Savage 700W LED Studio Light Kit consists of two umbrella AC sockets with 50W LED lamps attached to them. Combined, the lamps emit the equivalent of 700W of continuous daylight-balanced light. The...
1 month ago
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The topic of this article might seem easy-breezy to compose, but truth be told—it isn’t. For starters, how do you define “travel friendly?” Where are you going? How are you getting there? And what exactly do you plan on photographing once you get there? Do you already own a camera and lenses? If you do, are you happy with them and, if not, why? There’s simply no way we can address every scenario...
1 month ago
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Despite its greatly reported demise, film is proving to be alive and well among a small yet loyal pool of photo enthusiasts, hipsters, and Luddites. Judging by the bump in price of used film cameras over the past few years, the numbers of this pool are growing. That’s the good news. The not-so-good news is traveling with film—especially flying with film—which requires more pre-planning on your...
2 months ago
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When Philippe Kahn and his wife were expecting their first child, his plan was to photograph the event using his smartphone so he could share the event with friends and family. The only problem was that it was 1997 and smartphones hadn’t been invented yet. So, Kahn did what any mathematician / technological envelope-pusher would do: he shoehorned a miniature camera into a Motorola cell phone and—...
2 months ago
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If you’ve ever tackled small-product photography, armed with the wrong tools, you know how challenging it can be to capture photos worth the time invested in taking them. Approaching small-product photography with the right tools is a whole other experience. Depending on your needs, the Savage...
3 months ago
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According to Tokina, “FíRIN” is a variation of an old Irish word Fírinne, which means “truth,” “what is real,”or “being true to someone or something.” Unlike the consumer-targeted offerings previously marketed by Tokina, FíRIN-series lenses are designed, manufactured, and marketed as premium-quality lenses that equal or surpass their name-brand counterparts in terms of build and image quality. (...
3 months ago
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The Meyer Optik Gӧrlitz Trioplan 100 f/2.8 is a new lens with a long history. Dating back more than a hundred years, the Trioplan 100 is a triplet design which, as the name implies, only contains three lens elements. Why people would be interested in an optical dinosaur a century down the pike has to do with the...
3 months ago
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Close-ups taken with wider-angle lenses also expose subtle detail, but by framing your subject in its surroundings, you also create a narrative to go along with the visual detail. “Normal” macro photographs expose detail, ultra-wide-angle close-ups tell stories. Photographs © Allan Weitz Macro photography is fascinating in the way it enables us to focus on the kind of subtle details we seldom...
3 months ago
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If you’d like to start taking professional-quality close-ups of the world around you without having to upgrade your existing camera and lens system or purchase a macro lens, you’re going to find this post quite agreeable. Without pooh-poohing the imaging abilities of the flagship cameras from any of the major camera manufacturers, there’s little doubt the picture-taking abilities of entry-level...
3 months ago
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Question: Is there a “best” format for shooting macro close-ups? If you tell me “full-frame,” I won’t argue with you. I’ve taken many fine macro close-ups with 4 x 5" studio cameras, medium-format cameras, APS-C, Micro Four Thirds, and even point-and-shoot cameras. And you know what? They’re all perfect in their own way. Above image: Detail, old railroad tie (Olympus M.ZUIKO Digital 30 f/3.5...
5 months ago
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After 80 years in print, and as an online entity, Popular Photography magazine and its sister publication, American Photo, have taken their final bows. This news is no doubt weepier for those who grew up during the pre-Internet Dark Ages when Pop Photo was the premier photography magazine in a field of about a dozen competing photography publications. Fun fact: Once upon a time, the last 40 or so...
5 months ago
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Miggo has announced eight new products to complement its increasingly popular product lines. The first groups of products would be four new Splat-series tripods. With a unique organic look, they are made from bendable non-slip materials, making the miggo Splat tripods ideal for travel. They take up little in the way of room and can be rested, attached to, or wrapped around all kinds of surfaces,...

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