Allan Weitz

Allan Weitz

A graduate of the High School of Art and Design and the School of Visual Arts in New York City, Allan Weitz started taking pictures when digital meant doing something with your fingers. Currently the host of the B&H Photography Podcast and a member of the B&H Explora writing team, his work has appeared in (and on the covers of) dozens of publications, including New York magazine, Philadelphia magazine, Esquire, GQ, Yachting, and Nautical Quarterly.

Latest Articles

2 days ago
Share
When 35mm reflex cameras (SLRs) began arriving on our shores 70-odd years ago, the widest focal length lenses available at the time were 35mm (about 60° AoV). Wider-angle non-retrofocus lenses existed, but because their rear elements back-focused to within 5 to 10mm from the focus plane (film or camera sensor), they proved impractical for use in SLRs, which require 35-40mm of back focus to...
1 week ago
Share
I always wanted to own a Leica but, cost factors aside, the camera wasn’t right for me because rangefinder cameras simply cannot focus close enough for the kind of in-your-face close-ups I enjoy shooting. I’ve long been a fan of Leica lenses and have shot with many over the years, but the inability to shoot close-ups without having to resort to additional hardware put the kibosh on any further...
1 week ago
Share
If photographers were to agree on two things, they would have to be the following, although not necessarily in this order: A) You can never have enough camera bags; B) There’s no such thing as the “perfect” camera bag. Now, I’ll be the first to admit I own too many camera bags, although, if brought before a jury of my peers I could justify each of these purchases, even if I’ve only used some of...
2 weeks ago
Share
As a working photographer, the center of the universe is your camera bag and its contents. Your cameras and lenses are the tools of your trade. As you may have noted, both are mentioned in plural because just as you wouldn’t jump out of an airplane without a backup parachute, you shouldn’t attempt to photograph an emotionally spiked, non-repeatable event armed with only one camera. The same...
2 weeks ago
Share
When the first few generations of mirrorless cameras began arriving on our shores, they weren’t taken seriously by wedding photographers, due to sluggish autofocusing (compared to DSLRs) and, more importantly, the dearth of lens options. That’s no longer the case. Today, Sony offers an attractive selection of fixed prime and zoom lenses to go along with its greatly improved mirrorless cameras....
4 weeks ago
Share
When you say the word “photograph” to people, with the exception of square-cropping Instagrammers, most of us think of rectangles. This is because most consumer cameras produce photographs in the form of rectangles with aspect ratios of 2:3 or 4:3. The problem is that while most photographs fit well into these camera-defined format restraints, some images work better as squares—or elongated...
1 month ago
Share
Show me a serious DSLR or mirrorless camera shooter and I’ll show you somebody who has a 70-200mm f/2.8 zoom lens tucked away in his or her camera bag. Paired with its wider-angle counterpart, the equally fast 24-70mm f/2.8...
1 month ago
Share
Seascapes are like landscapes… only more. I say that because just like landscapes, they contain open skies and land masses, but they also contain water—lots of water, and that’s where they differ. Photographs © Allan Weitz, 2017 A seascape captured at...
1 month ago
Share
I picked up my first camera in September, 1966. In the five decades since then, I’ve come to understand a number of truisms about the art and craft of picture taking. The following are 50 tips I’ve compiled, based on my professional and personal experiences shooting with film and digital cameras, ranging from 8mm Minox spy cameras to 20 x 24" studio salon cameras. My list is broken down into two...
2 months ago
Share
Hasselblad has been the gold standard among studio, fashion, portrait, and landscape photographers since the original model 1000F was introduced in 1948. Though best known for its venerable square-format 500-series single lens reflex cameras (posthumously retitled Hasselblad V-series cameras), two Hasselblads have...
2 months ago
Share
Most photographers think of tripods when the subject of camera supports is raised. While tripods fill the bill in most situations, there are plenty of scenarios in which traditional tripods don’t cut the mustard. The following are 20 camera supports designed to secure your camera in place when working in situations or locales in which traditional tripods fall short. The...
2 months ago
Share
High marks from lens test labs are nothing to sniffle at, but as any seasoned shooter can tell you, the resolving power of a lens is only part of the equation when it comes to defining superior lens quality. Lots of lenses are sharp, but how many sharp lenses have a look about them that makes you pause to take a closer look? Zeiss lenses have long been revered for their look. High resolving power...
3 months ago
Share
The best wide-angle lens? Take two steps backward, look for the ‘ah-ha.’” —Ernst Haas Notwithstanding Mr. Haas’s very astute comment, I have always loved wide-angle lenses. Well, more accurately, I love the inclusive, often distorted, sometimes messy perspectives they create; those of the street photographer, the documentarian, the artist. It is often noted that a 50mm lens is closest to the...
3 months ago
Share
Let’s be honest. If you took the nameplates and other identifying alphanumeric markings off most of the cameras we sell at B&H and mix them together with their respective competitors, you’d be hard-pressed to tell many of them apart. Like most American, Japanese, and Korean sedans, the majority of consumer cameras look and function alike. The following cameras stand out from the masses for...
3 months ago
Share
Pancake lenses, those small fixed focal length lenses that barely protrude from your camera’s lens mount, are becoming increasingly common, and for several reasons. Most commonly based on a simple Zeiss Tessar lens design that dates back more than a hundred years, pancake lenses have come back into vogue mostly due to size—they extend an inch or less from the camera body—and weight, which on...

Pages

Close

Close

Close