Allan Weitz

Allan Weitz

A graduate of the High School of Art and Design and the School of Visual Arts in New York City, Allan Weitz started taking pictures when digital meant doing something with your fingers. Currently the host of the B&H Photography Podcast and a member of the B&H Explora writing team, his work has appeared in (and on the covers of) dozens of publications, including New York magazine, Philadelphia magazine, Esquire, GQ, Yachting, and Nautical Quarterly.

Latest Articles

1 week ago
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According to Tokina, “FíRIN” is a variation of an old Irish word Fírinne, which means “truth,” “what is real,”or “being true to someone or something.” Unlike the consumer-targeted offerings previously marketed by Tokina, FíRIN-series lenses are designed, manufactured, and marketed as premium-quality lenses that equal or surpass their name-brand counterparts in terms of build and image quality. (...
1 week ago
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The Meyer Optik Gӧrlitz Trioplan 100 f/2.8 is a new lens with a long history. Dating back more than a hundred years, the Trioplan 100 is a triplet design which, as the name implies, only contains three lens elements. Why people would be interested in an optical dinosaur a century down the pike has to do with the...
1 week ago
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Close-ups taken with wider-angle lenses also expose subtle detail, but by framing your subject in its surroundings, you also create a narrative to go along with the visual detail. “Normal” macro photographs expose detail, ultra-wide-angle close-ups tell stories. Photographs © Allan Weitz Macro photography is fascinating in the way it enables us to focus on the kind of subtle details we seldom...
1 week ago
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If you’d like to start taking professional-quality close-ups of the world around you without having to upgrade your existing camera and lens system or purchase a macro lens, you’re going to find this post quite agreeable. Without pooh-poohing the imaging abilities of the flagship cameras from any of the major camera manufacturers, there’s little doubt the picture-taking abilities of entry-level...
1 week ago
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Question: Is there a “best” format for shooting macro close-ups? If you tell me “full-frame,” I won’t argue with you. I’ve taken many fine macro close-ups with 4 x 5" studio cameras, medium-format cameras, APS-C, Micro Four Thirds, and even point-and-shoot cameras. And you know what? They’re all perfect in their own way. Above image: Detail, old railroad tie (Olympus M.ZUIKO Digital 30 f/3.5...
2 months ago
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After 80 years in print, and as an online entity, Popular Photography magazine and its sister publication, American Photo, have taken their final bows. This news is no doubt weepier for those who grew up during the pre-Internet Dark Ages when Pop Photo was the premier photography magazine in a field of about a dozen competing photography publications. Fun fact: Once upon a time, the last 40 or so...
2 months ago
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Miggo has announced eight new products to complement its increasingly popular product lines. The first groups of products would be four new Splat-series tripods. With a unique organic look, they are made from bendable non-slip materials, making the miggo Splat tripods ideal for travel. They take up little in the way of room and can be rested, attached to, or wrapped around all kinds of surfaces,...
3 months ago
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Thirty-something years ago, I needed a sturdy camera support that would enable me to take a series of photographs from ground level. After a bit of shopping around, I purchased a Leica Tabletop Tripod and a...
3 months ago
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When 35mm reflex cameras (SLRs) began arriving on our shores 70-odd years ago, the widest focal length lenses available at the time were 35mm (about 60° AoV). Wider-angle non-retrofocus lenses existed, but because their rear elements back-focused to within 5 to 10mm from the focus plane (film or camera sensor), they proved impractical for use in SLRs, which require 35-40mm of back focus to...
3 months ago
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I always wanted to own a Leica but, cost factors aside, the camera wasn’t right for me because rangefinder cameras simply cannot focus close enough for the kind of in-your-face close-ups I enjoy shooting. I’ve long been a fan of Leica lenses and have shot with many over the years, but the inability to shoot close-ups without having to resort to additional hardware put the kibosh on any further...
3 months ago
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If photographers were to agree on two things, they would have to be the following, although not necessarily in this order: A) You can never have enough camera bags; B) There’s no such thing as the “perfect” camera bag. Now, I’ll be the first to admit I own too many camera bags, although, if brought before a jury of my peers I could justify each of these purchases, even if I’ve only used some of...
3 months ago
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As a working photographer, the center of the universe is your camera bag and its contents. Your cameras and lenses are the tools of your trade. As you may have noted, both are mentioned in plural because just as you wouldn’t jump out of an airplane without a backup parachute, you shouldn’t attempt to photograph an emotionally spiked, non-repeatable event armed with only one camera. The same...
3 months ago
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When the first few generations of mirrorless cameras began arriving on our shores, they weren’t taken seriously by wedding photographers, due to sluggish autofocusing (compared to DSLRs) and, more importantly, the dearth of lens options. That’s no longer the case. Today, Sony offers an attractive selection of fixed prime and zoom lenses to go along with its greatly improved mirrorless cameras....
4 months ago
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When you say the word “photograph” to people, with the exception of square-cropping Instagrammers, most of us think of rectangles. This is because most consumer cameras produce photographs in the form of rectangles with aspect ratios of 2:3 or 4:3. The problem is that while most photographs fit well into these camera-defined format restraints, some images work better as squares—or elongated...
4 months ago
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Show me a serious DSLR or mirrorless camera shooter and I’ll show you somebody who has a 70-200mm f/2.8 zoom lens tucked away in his or her camera bag. Paired with its wider-angle counterpart, the equally fast 24-70mm f/2.8...

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