SUYS

by Steven Gladstone ·Posted
In this segment of Show Us Your Shot, filmmaker Alec Kubas-Meyer gives us a behind-the-scenes look at a video review of the 2018 thriller, Searching. Because the film takes place entirely on a computer desktop, Kubas-Meyer deviated from his usual review technique and chose to mimic the visual style of the film itself. So watch and follow along as he shows his filming setup, and how he accomplished his result.
by Steven Gladstone ·Posted
In this segment of Show Us Your Shot, skydiver and aerial cinematographer Laszlo Andacs discusses the possibilities and the challenges of camera work while jumping out of airplanes. The piece is illustrated with breathtaking aerial sequences that capture the beauty and technique of aerial cinematography as the cameraman hurtles toward the ground with cameras mounted on his helmet. You can see footage of jumps and the preparation behind them as Andacs and other cameramen capture various projects, such as Anthony Flammia's music video "My Life
by Steven Gladstone ·Posted
In this segment of Show Us Your Shot, visual effects supervisor Adam C. Sager discusses how the team behind the 2018 Tribeca-selected, stop-motion animated short film, Two Balloons, utilized green-screen compositing to isolate and combine various shot elements together into seamless compositions. Writer/Director/Producer: Mark Smith Animation Director: Teresa Drilling Art Director: Kathleen Chamberlain Director of Photography: Reijean Heringlake Motion Control Operators: Mark Eifert, Jim Birkett Special Effects Supervisor: Javan Ivey Visual
by Steven Gladstone ·Posted
In this segment of Show Us Your Shot, director Aaron Barrocas discusses how the production team of the horror-comedy short film Half-Cocked was able to create the illusion, safely, of a character being hit by a car, despite not having the time or budget for stunt performers or wire work. It is important to note that at no point was the actor in any danger, and he never made contact with the vehicle. Cast: Pat Healy, Vanessa Benavente, Lundon Boyd Writer/Director/Editor: Aaron Barrocas Producers: Sophia Cacciola & Michael J. Epstein
by Steven Gladstone ·Posted
In the segment of Show Us Your Shot, filmmaker Sam Stephan shares the details behind the making of his short film, The Third Day. “On The Third Day, we budgeted for four days of shooting the 11-page script. Various high-frame-rate shots and zooms had been conceptualized from the beginning, so we chose the Angenieux Optimo 17-80mm T2.2 zoom lens and a RED Scarlett-W. Zooms kept the frame moving without the use of dollies or stabilizers, both of which can become expensive and time consuming to utilize. I also feel that zooms communicate
by Steven Gladstone ·Posted
In the segment of Show Us Your Shot, Director Roderick E. Stevens and Cinematographer Daniel Gonsalez, in an effort to accentuate the grounded reality of their hero's journey in the latter half of the film, chose to mix shooting styles and formats, including Super 8 film for the opening flashback scenes, 4k RAW (on a Sony F55) for the first half of the roadtrip with the two brothers, and 35mm (Arricam LT) once protagonist Michael steals the car to embark on his own adventure. Both larger formats were captured with vintage, Todd AO, anamorphic
by Steven Gladstone ·Posted
In this segment of Show Us Your Shot, filmmaker Jillian Bullock filmed a scene in Fairmount Park, in Philadelphia, in the summer: “We headed out early to beat the heat, but we had a problem with the DJI Ronin Gimbal, which wasn’t cooperating. This meant we had to do more takes of the scene. I made sure we had plenty of water bottles available for cast and crew. More care was given to the lead female actor, Tamara Woods, who was pregnant at the time. We kept taking breaks in order for her to hydrate and get a little rest. I told her to stand in
by Steven Gladstone ·Posted
In this segment of Show Us Your Shot, filmmaker Sophia You, Executive Producer Samantha Tan, and Creator Jenna Lam guide us through the filming of an episode of Ambitious, a web series about an Asian-American girl who cannot seem to find a place where she feels she belongs. In the final scene of the series’ finale, she placed the two main characters inside a frame within a frame to suggest that they cannot escape the situation in which they find themselves and must draw closer to each other, literally and metaphorically, to have an honest
by Steven Gladstone ·Posted
In the segment of Show Us Your Shot, Director Roderick E. Stevens and Cinematographer Daniel Gonzalez explored a few options for safely capturing the driving scenes in this road movie, including using a 70" LED TV as a background, before settling on green screen for compositing. This also freed Stevens up to manipulate the art direction and color grading further to create a contrast between the heightened, almost surreal first half against the familiar reality of the latter half. Roderick Stevens’s Bio
by Steven Gladstone ·Posted
In this segment of Show Us Your Shot, Gregory Blair pays homage to indie horror filmmakers, creating a disorienting feeling without the use of high-tech effects, CGI, or jibs and cranes. “Deadly Revisions is a psychological thriller that pays homage to several horror films and filmmakers. In this scene, we wanted to give a loving nod to Sam Raimi and the Evil Dead films. The scene involves Bill Oberst Jr. as Grafton Torn—a horror-film writer with amnesia, haunted by nightmares—who is having a sort of breakdown/hallucination moment. We
by Steven Gladstone ·Posted
In this segment, Chris Seivard shares with us how he pulled off a professional shoot for a client, using mostly natural daylight streaming through the location’s windows, supplemented with two LED fixtures to light the interior. Watch the video, as Seivard explains his setup, and be sure to study the lighting diagram. This project was for an insurance company. The goal was to give investigators a feel for what the deposition process might be like, after an incident investigation.
by Steven Gladstone ·Posted
The test involved an actor, dressed in a cowboy outfit, lighting up and smoking a cigar. The test was done late in the day, with no additional lights, and we were racing against the sun. The green screen we had was a little bit on the pale/unsaturated side, but we went ahead with it anyway. We imported the footage into Final Cut Pro and applied the Keyer effect. Most of it was working well, except there were some areas that were bleeding through the image so we tried to clean that up with the addition of masks/garbage mattes. You can see where
by Steven Gladstone ·Posted
In Learning to Drive, Director Roderick E. Stevens wanted the camera to drop straight down over the actor, the way it might on a telescopic crane. Without the budget to rent one, that seemed impossible. It’s a simple shot that only lasts a few seconds, but it occurs at a crucial turning point in the film, and the director is far too stubborn to give up. About $150 in electrical conduit and hardware and some funky engineering resulted in a vertical slider that accomplished the shot. Roderick Stevens's Bio
by Steven Gladstone ·Posted
In this segment of Show Us Your Shot, filmmaker Steven Gladstone shares with us the differences between a dolly and a zoom. He begins by recreating a two-dolly combination move using a skateboard dolly and a slider, and then moves on to examine the choice between zoom in and dolly in. “With the small size and lightweight nature of today’s equipment, once-difficult shots become easier to pull off. I took this opportunity to try the shot with a dolly and a zoom, and it makes a great illustration of the differences between the two.” About
by Steven Gladstone ·Posted
In this segment of Show Us Your Shot, filmmaker Jillian Bullock explains how her DP created a desert shot at night, while shooting in Pennsylvania. We had filmed some scenes at the Bill Pickett Riding Academy, in Philadelphia, a horse-riding stable. My DP, Lamont Fountain, and I were there trying to figure out where we could shoot to make it look like a battle area in Iraq or Afghanistan. Since we were shooting at night, we figured we could fake out a spot in the woods behind