Photography / Buying Guide

12 Recommended Travel Tripods

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The travel tripod conundrum is a cruel reality of physics and practicality. The larger and heavier a tripod is, the steadier it will hold a camera. The larger and heavier a tripod is, the less likely you will ever want to carry it around or take it on a trip. Why are we left with a photographic reality like that which makes the tastiest food bad for you?

Tripods come in all shapes, weights, heights, and styles. If you are new to the world of tripods, please check out The Tripod Explained article before reading further. Here we are going to recommend travel tripods for the photographer. First, we must ask, “What makes one a ‘travel’ tripod?”

Well, any tripod is a travel tripod if you are willing to travel with it, but some tripods are designed to fold up into a compact package that, in some cases, can fit into a carry-on bag. They are also designed to be lighter than their full-sized counterparts. Usually, they have four or more leg sections, legs that can fold up around the center column, or a center column that drops down between the legs for transport. In general, they do not extend to the same heights as full-sized tripods, so get ready to bend over while shooting. Other than those features, the travel tripod is basically the same as any other three-legged camera support.

I visited the B&H SuperStore and picked the brains of the store’s tripod experts, got hands-on with all of the different options, and have compiled this list of the 12 travel tripods shown here, in price order, with the highest priced (as of press time) first.

1.Gitzo GK1545T-82TQD Series 1 Traveler Carbon Fiber Tripod with Center Ball Head

Well, it really doesn’t get any better than the Gitzo GK1545T-82TQD travel tripod and Center Ball Head, and the price would certainly indicate that. The entire design of the Gitzo travel tripod is based on maximizing its thin profile. The odd-shaped head is purposely curvy to accommodate the legs when inverted for transport. Gitzo travel tripod legs are narrower than much of the competition, but generally maintain higher load capacities. O-rings seal the top of the twist locks to keep debris out, the legs can be set at one of two angles, and the chassis is made of magnesium. The center ball head is a fine complement to its gorgeous legs and features a separate pan lock knob, screw lock for the Arca-type compatible plate, and a tungsten disulfide coating for silky smooth action. Like Manfrotto, Gitzo sells individual parts for its tripods, so if you wear out a component, it can be replaced.

Gitzo GK1545T-82TQD Series 1 Traveler Carbon Fiber Tripod with Center Ball Head

Oddly, a lower-cost alternative has slightly larger legs, and a 26-lb capacity; the CG2545T-82QD.

Gitzo GK1545T-82TQD Series 1 Traveler Carbon Fiber Tripod with Center Ball Head
Load Capacity: 22 lb
Max. Height: 64.4"
Min. Height: 12.6"
Folded Length: 16.7"
Leg Sections: 4
Weight: 3.2 lb

2. Benro FTA28CV1 Travel Angel Series 2 Carbon Fiber Tripod with V1E Ball Head

Benro does a nice travel tripod with many full-sized tripod features. The Benro FTA28CV1 Travel Angel Series 2 Carbon Fiber Tripod with V1E Ball Head has a very respectable load capacity of 22 lb, and can easily handle a DSLR or mirrorless setup. The unit has a lot of center-column versatility because the column can be removed and attached to a removable leg to form a monopod. The leg angle lock design is more reminiscent of a full-sized tripod, just smaller. A unique carbon veneer looks very cool. The V1E ball head is Arca-type compatible, has a separate panning lock, coaxial friction adjustment for the main knob, bubble level, and the Benro P&T (pull-and-twist) safety release system to prevent accidental drops of your camera.

Benro FTA28CV1 Travel Angel Series 2 Carbon Fiber Tripod with V1E Ball Head

There is a 5-section carbon alternative that folds up even shorter, as well as an aluminum 4-section version.

Benro FTA28CV1 Travel Angel Series 2 Carbon Fiber Tripod with V1E Ball Head
Load Capacity: 22 lb
Max. Height: 66.9"
Min. Height: 18.7"
Folded Length: 24.6"
Leg Sections: 4
Weight: 4 lb

3. Oben CT-3535 Folding Carbon Fiber Travel Tripod with BE-208T Ball Head

When it comes to versatility, look no further than Oben. You can tell that the company likes packing the maximum number of features into each tripod it markets. Built for mirrorless and small DSLR setups, the Oben AT-3535 Folding Carbon Fiber Travel Tripod and BE-208T Ball Head is no exception. Where do I start? Brought your Oben tripod, but need a monopod or selfie stick? Done. Just unscrew one of the legs. For low-angle shooting, the kit comes with a removable center column and optional included short center column. Also included are retractable spikes, strap, bag, tools, and quick-release plate. The BE-208T head has a separate panning lock, bubble levels, and an Arca-type compatible quick-release plate.

Oben CT-3535 Folding Carbon Fiber Travel Tripod with BE-208T Ball Head

The aluminum sibling to this tripod is the Oben AT-3535.

Oben CT-3535 Folding Carbon Fiber Travel Tripod with BE-208T Ball Head
Load Capacity: 9 lb
Max. Height: 51.6"
Min. Height: 8.6"
Folded Length: 12"
Leg Sections: 5
Weight: 2.5 lb

4. Manfrotto 190Go! Aluminum Tripod Kit with Ball Head

One look at the Manfrotto 190Go! Aluminum Tripod and Ball Head and you can tell that the Manfrotto folks spend a good bit of time on design. The 190Go! tripod has been on the market for a while, but that does not keep Manfrotto from incorporating a modern look into its designs. The innovative design of the center column allows it to be rolled quickly to the 90-degree lateral shooting position—very rare for a travel tripod. The leg-angle locks are little pieces of sculpted art, and the twist locks have snazzy red top and bottom accents. This is a good-looking tripod with innovative design attributes.

Manfrotto 190Go! Aluminum Tripod Kit with Ball Head

Want an alternative? There is a 3-way head, carbon fiber ball head, or carbon 3-way option, as well.

Manfrotto 190Go! Aluminum Tripod Kit with Ball Head
Load Capacity: 13.2 lb
Max. Height: 61.4"
Min. Height: 2.75"
Folded Length: 21.6"
Leg Sections: 4
Weight: 4.6 lb

5. Sirui T-025X Carbon Fiber Tripod with C-10S Ball Head

One trip to the Sirui display in the B&H SuperStore and you will see that this is a company dedicated to designing and building travel tripods. The very lightweight (1.5 lb) and compact (12.2") T-025X Carbon Fiber Tripod with C-10S Ball Head is a fine tool for the traveling photographer with a small DSLR or mirrorless camera. Rare among travel tripods, this Sirui has a 2-section removable center column for low-angle shooting down to 4.1". The twist-lock leg design is straightforward and the overall feel of the unit is that of quality. The cleanly designed head is Arca-type compatible and has a separate pan lock knob.

Sirui T-025X Carbon Fiber Tripod with C-10S Ball Head

The aluminum alternate from Sirui is the T-005X and C-10S ball head.

Sirui T-025X Carbon Fiber Tripod with C-10S Ball Head
Load Capacity: 8.8 lb
Max. Height: 54.4"
Min. Height: 4.1"
Folded Length: 12.2"
Leg Sections: 5
Weight: 1.5 lb

6. 3 Legged Thing Corey Aluminum Travel Tripod with AirHed Neo Ball Head

One thing that many of the 3 Legged Thing tripods feature is load capacities that are much higher than other similarly priced and sized tripods. The Corey Aluminum Travel Tripod with Neo Ball Head has a load capacity of 30 lb, larger than any other tripod on this list, while still packing up to a diminutive length. The Corey is a bit more subdued than other models from 3 Legged Thing, but it still features a bit of blue and orange bling. The leg-angle locks are spring-loaded and accessible even when the legs are folded up around the center column. The shiny blue Neo ball head has an Arca-type-compatible plate, built-in bubble level, and single ball control for simplicity.

3 Legged Thing Corey Aluminum Travel Tripod with AirHed Neo Ball Head

A 3 Legged Thing carbon equivalent is the Eclipse Leo with AirHed Light ball head and a very full-sized 66.1-lb load capacity.

3 Legged Thing Corey Aluminum Travel Tripod with AirHed Neo Ball Head
Load Capacity: 30 lb
Max. Height: 58"
Min. Height: 4"
Folded Length: 13.7"
Leg Sections: 5
Weight: 3.4 lb

7. MeFOTO RoadTrip Aluminum Travel Tripod Kit

With 10 color options, the MeFoto Road Trip travel tripod is sure to accessorize your luggage or backpack successfully. The Road Trip has a respectable load capacity suitable for a DSLR rig, and the single foam-cushioned leg can be removed and attached to the center column to form a monopod or selfie stick. MeFoto is specializing in quality travel tripods, and the Road Trip is no exception. The dual-angle leg-angle locks are of the pull tab variety and have a nice feel, as do the two-tone leg twist locks. The ball head has separate panning and friction adjustments, as well as a bull’s-eye bubble level and Arca-type-compatible quick-release plate.

MeFOTO RoadTrip Aluminum Travel Tripod Kit

Carbon fiber fans should check out the MeFoto RoadTrip carbon version that comes in five colors, or the Air versions that feature a smartphone adapter and Bluetooth remote for selfies.

MeFOTO RoadTrip Aluminum Travel Tripod Kit
Load Capacity: 17.6 lb
Max. Height: 61.6"
Min. Height: 15.4"
Folded Length: 15.4"
Leg Sections: 5
Weight: 3.6 lb

8. Oben AT-3565 Folding Aluminum Travel Tripod with BC-217T Ball Head

Exactly like the Oben tripod mentioned above, the Oben AT-3565 Folding Aluminum Travel Tripod and BC-217T Ball Head is supremely versatile but has a larger load capacity. The AT-3656 comes with a removable leg for monopod/selfie stick uses, retractable spikes, removable center column, short center column, strap, bag, tools, and quick-release plate. An advantageous 20-lb load capacity means that you can mount up a heavy DSLR and zoom lens. The BC-217T head has adjustable friction semi-coaxially mounted on the main knob, a separate panning lock, bubble levels, and an Arca-type compatible quick-release plate.

Oben AT-3565 Folding Aluminum Travel Tripod with BC-217T Ball Head

A carbon fiber alternative is the CT-3581 and BE-126T Ball Head.

Oben AT-3565 Folding Aluminum Travel Tripod with BC-217T Ball Head
Load Capacity: 20 lb
Max. Height: 61.7"
Min. Height: 9.7"
Folded Length: 15.2"
Leg Sections: 5
Weight: 3.75 lb

9. Manfrotto BeFree Color Aluminum Travel Tripod

Leg flip locks are not too common in the world of the dedicated travel tripod, but they ride proudly on the Manfrotto BeFree Color Aluminum travel tripod. With the word “Color” in the name, the BeFree can be had in four different skins—blue, gray, green, and red. The unit is totally fit for a small DSLR or mirrorless camera rig, and it features a reversible column that can be flipped for low-angle work after unscrewing the weight hook at the bottom. One leg has a grippy rubber cover for carrying comfort and the design of the leg angle locks is really something cool. You can tell that a great deal of thought went into the design of the BeFree—it is kind of a piece of art unto itself. Up top is a smooth, single-lever-action ball head with a Manfrotto 200LT-PL quick-release plate, and it all comes with its own bag.

Manfrotto BeFree Color Aluminum Travel Tripod

An alternative to the aluminum BeFree is the carbon fiber version, with the same load capacity and just over ½ lb lighter.

Manfrotto BeFree Color Aluminum Travel Tripod
Load Capacity: 8.8 lb
Max. Height: 56.7"
Min. Height: 13.4"
Folded Length: 16.1"
Leg Sections: 4
Weight: 3.1 lb

10. Davis & Sanford TR654C-36 Traverse Carbon Fiber Grounder Tripod with Ball Head

Featuring a load capacity a bit higher than other travel tripods near its price range, the Davis & Sanford TR654C-36 Traverse Grounder also packs in some options usually seen only in full-sized supports. One of the legs has a foam grip for comfort and thermal protection for your hands, the legs can be set at one of three prescribed angles, and the rubber feet have retractable spikes for extra dig in softer terrain. The extra load capacity helps this rig accommodate a DSLR camera with a short zoom lens. The center column is reversible for low shooting and the ball head is Arca-type compatible with a separate panning lock. Also, surrounding the quick release plate are bubble levels for accuracy when shooting. It also comes with a carry bag.

Davis & Sanford TR654C-36 Traverse Carbon Fiber Grounder Tripod with Ball Head

The aluminum TR-553-228 is a more compact alternative.

Davis & Sanford TR654C-36 Traverse Carbon Fiber Grounder Tripod with Ball Head
Load Capacity: 12 lb
Max. Height: 65"
Min. Height: 9"
Folded Length: 18.5"
Leg Sections: 4
Weight: 3.25 lb

11. Vanguard VEO 235AB Aluminum Tripod with TBH-50 Ball Head

Innovative: Instead of having the three legs invert and fold up around the center column, the Vanguard VEO 235AB Aluminum Tripod with TBH-50 Ball Head has a fairly unique design that allows the center column to flip downwards for storage alongside the tripod legs. This allows for a much faster setup time, as you are only moving one component, not three, to get the tripod ready to extend. The leg-angle locks are also unique with their spring-loaded push-button releases. Flip-lock lovers will be happy with the two-toned locks on the Vanguard, as well. One leg is padded, and photographers can retract the rubber feet for spikes. It comes with a travel bag. The smooth TBH-50 ball head has a separate panning lock and is Arca-type compatible.

Vanguard VEO 235AB Aluminum Tripod with TBH-50 Ball Head

A slightly larger alternate version, the VEO 265AB, has a 17.6-lb load capacity.

Vanguard VEO 235AB Aluminum Tripod with TBH-50 Ball Head
Load Capacity: 13.2 lb
Max. Height: 58"
Min. Height: 7.25"
Folded Length: 14.9"
Leg Sections: 5
Weight: 3.3 lb

12. Slik Sprint Mini II GM 4-Section Tripod with SBH-100DQ Ball Head

I am sure many customers might see the price of the Slik Sprint Mini II GM and SBH-100DQ Ball Head and think that this is the budget buy of the group. Well, it is, but check out the positive reviews this super-light tripod gets from its users. At only 1.7 lb, this Slik weighs less than some stainless water bottles. It is not a tall tripod at 34.6", but that helps add to its stability so it can handle a small DSLR or mirrorless camera system. The dual-lock center column is reversible, but the legs do not invert around it for storage. Regardless, it packs small and the fact that you do not have to reverse the legs to set it up saves time. Each leg has a foam pad and the four-section legs have flip-locks. The center column is two-part that allows for low-angle shooting and the ball head has a single lever and proprietary quick-release plate.

Slik Sprint Mini II GM 4-Section Tripod w/ SBH-100DQ Ball Head

A distant Slik cousin is the Lite AL-420S that features an LED flashlight in the center column.

Slik Sprint Mini II GM 4-Section Tripod with SBH-100DQ Ball Head
Load Capacity: 4.5 lb
Max. Height: 34.6"
Min. Height: 5.9"
Folded Length: 13.8"
Leg Sections: 4
Weight: 1.72 lb

I hope this helps you find the travel tripod that best suits your needs and accompanies you on your next adventure! Of course, if you have any questions, post them below or feel free to stop by the B&H SuperStore in New York, speak with a sales professional on the telephone at 1-800-606-6969, or contact us online for a Live Chat.

Read more about tripods in these Explora articles: The Tripod Explained and 10 Recommended Tripods.

Items discussed in article

59 Comments

Great article and information on travel tripod options. I will be using a Canon 1dx with up to a 70-200 and can’t decide between the Gitzo Series 2 or the updated Befree Advanced Aluminum Travel Tripod from Manfrotto that’s not in the article. Is the Gitzo “worth” the extra cost compared to the new Befree for travel purposes? 

Thanks!

Hi Joe - 

For my money, given the very wide gap in cost, the Manfrotto Befree Advanced Travel Aluminum Tripod with Ball Head (Twist Locks, Black), is an easy choice.  If you intend on using a travel tripod on a very regular basis,  on rugged terrain, and in inclement weather conditions, then the  Gitzo GIGT2545T Traveler Series 2 Carbon Fiber Tripod makes more sense, given its more robust build - especially concerning its GH1382QD Series 1 Center Ball Head.

The Slik Sprint Mini II sounds like what I am looking for - light, compact, and quick set up.  I use a a T3i with a Tamron 16-300 lens. While the set up is not particularly heavy, I worry about how stable this tripod will be with the moment caused by having a bit longer lens on it.  Will this tripod provide a reasonably stable platform for me?

Hi Eric,

If you were just using the Canon T3i and the Tamron 16-300mm exclusively, then the Slik Sprint Mini II GM would be just fine. However, if adding another lens that is heavier in the future, you would be better off with the Vanguard VEO 235AB, as it is not much longer when folded, taller when opened and holds up to 13.2 lbs.

I am going to South East Asia and have a Sony a7sii and I am using a Sony 16-35 T lens and am trying to purchase a light weight tripod. Any suggestions?

Appeciate the helo.

-Engelbert

Hi Engelbert, 

Among the models discussed in the article, the Manfrotto 190Go!, B&H # MAT190GOC4TB is a great model to consider, due to its load capacity and height.

I'm going backpacking this weekend and want to bring my Canon T3i with me and a tripod. My current tripod is the Dolica GX-Series. I love all the features it offers but it's a little heavy/bulky for a backpacking trip/traveling in general.

Would you recommend anything lighter and more compact? Thank you! 

Why don't you include information on where the items are manufactured? I don't buy anything online that I don't know where it is made.

Hey Kevin,

I guess I will take your question as a suggestion and I'll try to edit the article in the near future.

For your reference here are the manufacturing locations I have at the top of my head:

Really Right Stuff - USA

Gitzo - Italy

Thanks for reading!

Thanks for the great article.  I have the mefoto road trip and am going to sell it mainly because of the set up time and but seems awkward to me while walking around.   I hate the twist lock legs and  I really want the quick release legs. I am looking at the Slik Sprint Mini II GM (big sister to the mini at 1.96 lbs).   My real concern is walking around with my canon 5ti with 17-85 Sigma lens on it.  I read below that WK would not walk around with the Silk Sprint Mini with the camera on it.  Have others have experience with this.  I do night photography and walk from area to area on riverbanks.  Having to take my camera off every time would be a show stopper.   Thanks for any help

Hi Maryann,

I can see the concern that WK had about carrying the Slik Sprint Mini II GM while the camera is mounted to is, being that it only holds up to 4.5 lbs.  I would personally be more comfortable doing so with a tripod that has a heavier load capacity. If you were departing from your MeFOTO tripod, but wanted something with the same load capacity but with flip lock legs, I feel that the Vanguard VEO 235AB would be a solid choice.

I will be traveling for a month and am looking for a lightweight tripod for my canon t61. I would like to keep my backpack as light as possible, but still want something stable for night sky photos. I was looking at the Sirui T-025X? What are your thoughts or suggestions?

Thanks Cyndi

Hi Cyndi - 

Great pick Cyndi!  At just two pounds with a load capacity just over 13 lbs and folded length of about 13inches, this is an ideal tripod system for the traveler, hiker, and  backpacker. It is lightweight, robustly built and very stable.

The T-025X Carbon Fiber Tripod with C-10S Ball Head from Sirui is a compact, ultra-lightweight, and stylish tripod with an included head. With upward-folding legs, it collapses to just 13.2", with the head attached, and weighs just 2.0 lb. Supporting loads up to 13.2 lb, this tripod is capable of holding DSLR cameras with lightweight lenses and is ideal for compact and mirrorless cameras and camcorders.

The T-025X features twist locks for easy setup and each leg has and automatic leg-angle lock mechanism for speed and convenience. A removable center column allows for table-top and low angle shooting as low as 7.7", with the ball head. When fully extended, the tripod reaches a maximum height of 54.5" with the head attached.

The C-10S is an extremely capable ball head. Its separate knobs for pan and tilt adjustments enable the user to perform tasks such as panoramic photography while keeping the tilt locked. An Arca-type compatible quick release plate is included, as is a soft carrying case and a tool set.

A removable center column allows for table-top and low angle shooting.

Three leg-angle positions mean each leg can be set independently for use on uneven terrain.

Legs fold up 180º for extra compactness when stored.

For speed and convenience, each leg has an automatic leg-angle lock mechanism

Traveling bag and tools included

Timely information in our world as travel photographers. The information provided is most useful for traveling outside of the US or as hiking/backpacking photographers. Every less ounce will help. 

For domestic traveling, I still use my larger Manfroto carbon fiber tripod and a platform head (Bogen #3028) with a Nikon 810 body & my largest lens is 400mm. I break down the tripod parts and wrap them in bubble warp and send them in a sturdy cardboard box (8x8 in. x 4-5 ft. long) with foam on the bottom and top so that the components will not shift. Duck tape with additional foam padding is used near the head and feet of the tripod. I mail the tripod to the closest UPS service center or to an address where I will arrive for the first day of my trip. Generally, it takes 5 working days for the box to make the trip from the East to the West Coast. Insure the contents. Likewise, save the box and add a new mailing label for the return trip. If your airlines allows and extra bag along with your suitcase, check the box with your luggage.

This matter of convenience of using the same tripod allows me to work quickly, even with eyes closed, with my tripod and multiple lenses with the "Bogen Quick Release Plates" on each lens and camera bodies. One tripod plus one monopod for all shooting for weeks at a time.  

Thanks, Roy! Thanks for sharing your experiences and tips! Good stuff!

can any of the travel size tripod ball heads be removed to be replaced with a ball head with a 3/8 screw ?

You could remove the ball heads from these tripods, but if you just need to have a 3/8" thread on top, adding a reducer bushing would be the best option. One particular option is the Oben 3/8"-16 to 1/4"-20 Reducer Bushing B&H # OB1039, which screws onto the 1/4-20" thread at the top of the ball head, coverting it to 3/8-16".  https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/769749-REG/Oben_OB_1039_3_8_16_to_1_4_20_Reducer.html

The Sirui weighs 2 pounds with the head.

I got the Manfrotto BeFree tripod last May and I litterally hate it. I'm taking it back to trade it in tomorrow for something else. It's the only tripod I've ever fealt that way about before and I've been doing photography for over 50 yrs.

Sorry about your experience, Jim! If you have the time, please share your issues here so that your fellow B&H customers can hear about what you don't like about the tripod.

Thanks!

I'm searching a tripod that fits the following

  • fit into a normal size(not completely sure what that size means) backpack (especially going into a themepark like DisneyWorld)
  • around 6 to 7 feet in height
  • does not have to be super sturdy against the weather, and i'll be using the Sony a7 series camera on it.
  • has a built in video head on top

There aren’t many options that would be overly compact when folded and also have a max height of 6-7’, and fewer options with a video head on top. If you need to fit the tripod in a backpack, it would help to know the size of the backpack you need to fit the tripod in. Depending on the size, you might need to look at an option with either a shorter max height, or something without a video head. You could also consider a monopod with a fluid head: it would be a more compact option that would be able to extend further. I would suggest sending this inquiry to our Pro Photo Department via email with as much information as you can about the bag the tripod needs to fit in, and what exactly you plan on shooting.

When using some of the lighter tripods suitable for travel, I often hang my camera bag down between the legs to offer some weight and balance. Adds a little stability while retaining the benefit of a lightweight tripod. And with today's lightweight cameras, helps keep the assembly steady (and upright) if it is a bit breezy.

Great tip, Ernie!

Most of the tripods above (if not all) do have weight hooks for ballast. Always be careful when hanging your camera bag so that it doesn't accidently fall off the hook, or open up and spill its precious contents on the ground below!

Thanks for sharing the tip!

HI, I was wondering what you thought of the Mefotto globe trotter, or road Trip  AIR series?  Only ONE adjusment in the legs.  Was curious why not in the review, just the other version.  Didn't they make the grade?  I am about to purchase one, and having some of the same concerns OP have with the fiddle factor in the screw lock legs.  This would answer that issue, just wondering what you thought.

Thanks in advance.

Liz

Hi Liz,

The GlobeTrotters are very similar to the RoadTrip, but they are slightly bigger and take up a bit more room when folded. If you have the space, you could easily go with the larger version.

The single-adjustment legs of the Air series are intriguing for their speed and simplicity, but the experts at the store recommended the more traditional multi-adjustment version as their top choice. Having said that, it is getting great reviews on our site from customers, so you'll probably be happy with that as well. 

The reason we didn't cover the other versions in the article is because we wanted to avoid talking about every tripod on the market! :) That wouldn't help narrow the buying decision at all.

Let me know if you have more questions.

Thanks for stopping by!

I have the MeFoto Globetrotter, and I really like it as a travel tripod.

i am gonna puchasing sony alpha 2 s so please tell me which one tripod good for this camera and slider ?

This would depend on the slider you are using as well as the lens(es).  For this, I would suggest sending us an email, letting us know the above information as well as how tall you are (or the max height you want the tripod to be).  We would then be able to recommend some options.  AskPhoto@bhphoto.com

Thank you for "inches" and "feet" calculations. You are very helpful to WHOLE world!!!

Very easy to convert to metric. Look for conversion calculators on line.

Hi Uyelik,

Thank you for your comment. Most of our customers live in the backwards parts of the world that embrace the Imperial system instead of the metric system. Therefore, in our blog articles, we only list Imperial measurments.

However, on the eCommerce side, we do provide metric specifications for all of our products.

I wish we used metric over here (with the exception of nautical miles)...and 24-hour time, but no one seems to listen to my arguments!

That is one of the best explanations I have seen in a long time. 

Thank you and you deserve a raise!

Thank you, Thomas! I will forward your terrific suggestion to my boss!

Thanks for having this comparison. What would help is if all the specs were more uniform and used the same unit standards. A spread sheet would help for quickly accessing the information. I am a backpacking photographer and every gram/oz counts and some of the descriptions did not have the total weight. I have moved from a DSLR (D-810) to mirror-less (X-Pro2)this past year and using the MeFoto backpacker.

The Benro Mach3 review states that the aluminum version is a budget alternative to the carbon fiber one that's featured. B&H currently sells the "budget" one for $10 MORE than the carbon fiber one lol

Hi, 

I am desperately looking for a camera bag. Could you recommend me a bag that compatible for hiking, travelling and outdoor shooting? 

Thank you. 

There are many great bag options on the market.  Though, we would need to know what equipment you want to fit in the bag.  For this, I would suggest reaching out to our Photo Department directly through an email, letting them know that you are looking for a camera bag good for hiking/traveling/outdoor use and a complete list of the equipment you would like to fit in the bag (which camera/lenses, tripod, flashes, non-photo items…).  They would then be able to make a couple suggestions for you.  AskPhoto@bhphoto.com

See LowePro.com

While there are excellent and costly photo bags, disguise can be a very useful defence agsainst mugging.  In a famous book "Design for the real world" writer said when travelling in apoor district, do not attract every thief arround with a bag that says expensive equipment, get a padded inner case but put it inside an old backpack, broken and tied up with string.

Same goes for travel computers, and any travel in 3rd world countries.

I travel w/ a heavy tripod: I'm unhappy carring it; but happy using it.
That's what I choose to do.

What tripod and head do you use?

I love my Gitzo 1544T.  Very compact and lightweight. Fits easily into a small carry on or backpack. It extends quickly and easily to a very acceptable working height and is very solid. I used it in the Galápagos Islands with a 1DMkIII and EF100-400mm attached with very acceptable results. It is my "daily driver" with my OM-D E-M1. 

Feisol ct-3442 with a cb50dc head it's the best. Fits very well into my carry on, 18.9", and weight's less than 3lb. Twist lock leghs, carbon fiber, compack, solid, beautifull, at half of the price of gitzo.

Best tripod yet-- Cameron carbon fibre tripod with BH10 ball head (CF500BH).  This has a load capacity of 10kg, and has a net weight of 0.73kg.   This will be used with my Nikon D600.   So far this is the lightest tripod I could find that could hold the heavy weight of my camera.  When closed, it is 320mm in length (12 inches), and when its fully open it is 1267mm in height (4.15 feet)

I have the Slik Sprint Mini II and I absolutely love it and use it more than all my other tripods combined. As I am in the market for a similar tripod for my girlfriend, I thought I'd shop around and see what new stuff has come along since I got my Mini II back in 2011. So, I came across this article. I'm sorry, but I have to say that it didn't help at all.

First of all, a travel tripod simply must have flip locks. It just MUST. Twist locks take way too long to set up and break down from shot to shot. Especially if there are 4 per leg! And particularly when hiking and not wanting to walk around with tripod legs extended. 12 or 9 twist-locks make you walk around with tripod legs extended. Then you trip on a root and goooooodbyyye caaameraaa! There are only, what, 2 or 3 tripods in this article with flip locks? And the Mini II is 1 of them.

And while I will admit that the Mini II is by no means a rock-solid heavyweight tripod, it faithfully supports more than the claimed 2.1 pounds. I routinely put a D600 with 24-85mm VR or D7100 with 50mm F1.4G on it and it has no problem. I've been mounting similarly weighing cameras on it for 4 years now and it's hangin' in there like a champ. The way I (ab)use this thing, I'd be willing to replace it every couple years (it's only $65 with ballhead and removable plate) but it just keeps going...

And the Mini II with head and plate weighs less than 2 pounds.

I suppose this article did help in that it reaffirmed I made the right decision back in 2011 and it looks like I'll be getting another Mini II for my girlfriend and I suggest everyone else give it serious consideration. Seriously, I'm laughing at these silly carbon tripods that cost several times as much and aren't half as usable. Lol, and that weigh nearly double what the Mini II weighs. Outside of big thick-tubed studio-type tripods (where weight-saving is pointless), carbon is crap. It's bendy and bouncy when thin, like in these kinds of tripods. I've been there...

Thanks for this well thought out and informative review of the article!  

I have the Slik sprint mini II as well and love the weight 1.7lb. Recently I acquired the Dolica TX570DS which is 2.5lb. What I like about the TX570DS is the sturdiness of the ball head. I could leave the camera on the tripod (Sony A7 in this case) and walk around with it. Something I wouldn't do with the the slik Sprint mini II.

Time will tell if the extra weight of the TX570DS is worth it.

Where is the Manfrotto Off Road Tripod, with only 1,4 lb, and designed to be used "Off Road".

I have the previous model of the Slik.  While this is not the best looking and it is definitely the least expensive of my four tripods, this unit is a lot of "bang for the buck".  One thing you didn't mention is that this tripod is supplied with a nylon case.  I have to admit I have taken more photos with this tripod than all the others combined.  The tripod you use is the one you have with you.  The tripod you have with you is the one you don't mind having to carry. At two pounds, it weighs less than my "travel" carbon fiber tripod.

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